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Peggy Sue Got Married by Jerry Leichtling and Arlene Sarner


                                  PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED


                                  An Original Screenplay

                                            by

                            Jerry Leichtling and Arlene Sarner


               REHEARSAL DRAFT - These changes are August 14, 1985





	Over BLACK, we HEAR the sounds of an old TAPE RECORDING.
	Young VOICES are filtered amid a noticeable hum, hiss and
	crackle. We HEAR giggling and then someone named Charlie
	making vows of love to someone named Peggy Sue.

				CHARLIE (0.S).
		Hi this is Charlie and...
		Come on, say your name.

				PEGGY (O.S.)
		Peggy Sue.

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		And we're here on the couch...

				PEGGY (0.S.)
		Don't say that...

	EXT. PEGGY'S NEIGHBORHOOD — DAY

	A split—level house on a slight grade of lawn. A red Honda
	the driveway.

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		We're here on the sofa bed...

				PEGGY (0.S.)
		Charlie...

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		...to record how much we love each
		other. Sitting beside me is the
		cutest majorette in the history of
		the world. And she would Like to
		say something.

	A real estate agent, a WOMAN, carries a "For Sale" sign to
	the center of the lawn and begins driving it in with a
	hammer.

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		Come on Peggy. Say what we
		rehearsed.

				PEGGY (O.S.)
		I can't. I'm too embarrassed.

	INT. BODELL HOUSE

	MOVING VIEW, revealing the empty house. We HEAR the RECORDING
	LOUDER.

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		But you love me don't you?

				PEGGY (0.S.)
		Yeah. Come on Charlie, turn it off.

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		And nothing will ever change that.

	Charlie starts giggling. We HEAR fumbling and tickling.

	CLOSE VIEW INTO THE KITCHEN - First we see a woman's hand, on
	the floor. It is partially covered with flour.

	MOVING VIEW reveals PEGGY BODELL, in her early 40's, fainted
	from heartbreak while baking a cake. Flour is scattered on
	the floor. She recovers from her faint. Confused, she
	steadies herself and brushes the flour from her dress.

	INT. GARAGE -- DAY

	Peggy's son, SCOTT, 16, is playing an old reel to reel tape
	recorder. There are stacks of boxes filled with personal
	things and records. His sister, BETH, 23, is packing.

				SCOTT
		Boy, have they changed. Who gets
		it?

				BETH
		I don't know, just put it back.

				CHARLIE (O.S.)
		Oh, gotta go. Here's a little
		make—out music.

	A record starts: "You Belong to Me" by the Duprees.

	INT. CHARLIE'S APARTMENT

	CHARLIE BODELL, early 40's, singing the same song. He can't
	hit a high note, turns off the water and steps out of the
	shower. JANET, his young, buxom girlfriend is in the bedroom.

				CHARLIE
		Goddamnit, I just can't hit those
		high notes anymore.

				JANET
		You know Charlie, if you're serious
		about this, I know a great vocal
		coach.

	Charlie's perplexed reaction.

	EXT. BODELL HOUSE - DAY

	"Crazy Charlie's Discount Appliances" truck has parked in
	front of the house. WORKMEN are loading boxes of records,
	tapes, etc. Charlie pulls up, waves to workmen.

	INT. KITCHEN/HALLWAY

	Peggy is loading the odd—shaped cakes into boxes. We note the
	grandfather clock tolling nine.

	VIEW IN HALLWAY

	Beth meets her father at the door.

				BETH
		Hi Dad, can I have 100 dollars for
		a brake job?

				CHARLIE
		Did I hear 70 dollars? What do you 
		need 50 dollars for? How's your
		Mom?

	Peggy comes out of the kitchen. Charlie has stopped
	conspicuously at the threshold. A workman comes from behind
	Peggy.

				WORKER
		Coming through.

				CHARLIE
		Frank, watch the clock.

	Peggy looks outside.

	EXT. HOUSE — PEGGY'S POV

	Janet is seated in Charlie's car.

	INT. HOUSE 

				PEGGY
		There's something pathetic parked
		in front of my house.

				CHARLIE
		Come off it, Peggy. And what do you
		mean your house? This is my house.
		I paid for it, I'm still paying for
		it.

				PEGGY
		I'm still waiting for the mortgage
		check.

				CHARLIE
		I mailed it to you on Wednesday.

				PEGGY
		Well, today's Saturday and it's
		still not here.

				CHARLIE
		Jesus, Peggy. Take it easy. I'm not
		used to that stuff. You always did
		the bills. Blame the damn post
		office.

	A workman approaches carrying an old mono record player:
	black and white, a real fifties artifact. For a moment their
	mutual resentment melts, as they look at each other.

				PEGGY
		That stays.

	The workman looks to Charlie for approval. Charlie nods. The
	workman shrugs, and heads back to the basement.

				CHARLIE
		You got a Tab?

				PEGGY
		I don't buy them anymore. You were
		the only one who drank them.

	INT. REC ROOM

	Peggy leads the way. At the far end, she flips a light switch
	that turns on a wall sculpture of lava lamps.

				CHARLIE
		You don't want them? They're going
		to make a big comeback any minute.
		Mark my words, these lamps are
		going to...

				PEGGY
		I know. Put Scott through college.

				CHARLIE
		I'll think of a way to sell, them.
			(beat)
		One day.

	Peggy opens a box filled with records. She closes it and
	moves to another. Charlie checks the contents of another box
	on the other side of the room.

				PEGGY
		Are you taking Janet to the reunion
		tonight?

				CHARLIE
		I'm not going.

	Scott calls from the top of the stairs.

				SCOTT
		Come on Dad!

				CHARLIE
		Be right there. I'll go through the
		rest of this stuff next weekend.

				SCOTT
		Bye Mom.

				PEGGY
		Bye sweetheart.

	Peggy and Charlie look at each other as Scott leaves.

				CHARLIE
			(with real, regret)
		I never thought it would go
		this far.

	Charlie exits. Peggy looks around. She slaps the flap of a
	box down, to close it, but it jumps back up.

					DISSOLVE:

	EXT. PEGGY'S DRIVEWAY

	Peggy and Beth carry the cake boxes into the car  A NEIGHBOR
	trimming the hedge watches them lasciviously.

	Peggy and Beth drive off.

	EXT. STREET

	Peggy's car rounds a corner into the business section of
	town.

	EXT. LOVIN' OVEN BAKE SHOP

	Peggy pulls up to the front door of The Lovin' Oven, her bake
	shop. Bags of bread and rolls lean against the door. Beth
	jumps out and opens the door of the shop. Peggy stacks the
	boxes in Beth's arms and opens the door for her.

				PEGGY
		If the pastries aren't here by nine
		thirty, call Monica and threaten
		her life.

	Peggy gets into the car, and blows a kiss to Beth.

				PEGGY
		I'll be back by noon.

	Peggy drives off as MONICA drives up. She exits her car and
	begins to unpack cake boxes.

				BETH
		Hi Monica. You just missed Mom.

				MONICA
		Sorry I'm late. My Bobo's back in
		town.

	EXT. KRISTIN'S COIFFURES HAIR SALON

	INSERT:	Sign: KRISTIN'S COIFFURES

	Peggy exits with a fifties flip. From a distance she looks
	like a fifties teenager. She nervously looks at her
	reflection. Maybe this was a mistake. Too late now.

	INT. PEGGY'S CAR — DRIVING

	Peggy is driving. On her car radio, we HEAR a local PHONE—IN
	TALK SHOW.

				WOMAN'S VOICE (V.O.)
		Hi. I'm Dolores Dodge. We're taking
		calls today on surrogate mothers.
		Wombs for rent. I want to know how
		you feel..

				PEGGY
		Oh, Dolores.

	Peggy switches stations until she finds the news.

	EXT. STREET CORNER

	Peggy stops for a red light. Her eye is caught by a Mercedes
	stopped next to her. Behind the wheel is a striking woman of
	her age, CAROL HEATH. They stare curiously for a beat, then:

				PEGGY
		Carol!

				CAROL
		Peggy Sue!

	They pull over to the side of the road.

	EXT. SIDE OF ROAD

	Exiting the cars, they hug.

				CAROL
		I haven't seen you in years. In all
		that time, haven't you at least
		tried another hair style?

	Peggy tries to laugh off her embarrassment.

				PEGGY
		1 just did it for the reunion. I
		thought it would be fun.

				CAROL
		You're probably the only one who
		could carry it off.

	INT. LOVIN' OVEN — DAY	

	Peggy and Carol enter as Beth finishes up with a customer.
	Peggy walks behind the counter as the customer exits.

				BETH
		Where were you? You said you'd be
		back at twelve.

				PEGGY
		This is my old friend Carol.. I
		told you about her.

	Beth and Carol exchange hellos.

				BETH
		r was worried about you  You didn't
		even call. You're always on my case
		if I don't call..

				PEGGY
		How do you like my hair?

				BETH
		It looks great. Don't change the
		subject. You know how busy
		Saturdays are. And I can't do the
		icing. I always mess up the roses.
		You're not being very responsible.

	Peggy takes over the work of decorating the large pennant
	shaped cake in silver icing: 25th Reunion — Buchanan High.'

				CAROL
		Who's the mother around here?

				BETH
		Sometimes I wonder.

	INT. TELEVISION STUDIO

	A television studio set made up of platforms covered with
	black cloth. Placed around the platforms on different levels
	are projection TVs, regular TVs, microwave ovens and other
	expensive, futuristic appliances. Charlie sits at one of them
	(or a table) as a CHINESE WAITER rushes in and puts a tray of
	fortune cookies down.

				WAITER
		Here Charlie, extra fortune
		cookies. Good luck.

				CHARLIE
		Thanks.

	Charlie grabs a cookie and puts it on the table in front of
	him, smashing it with his fist. He picks up and reads the
	fortune:

				CHARLIE
			(manic)
		Next week you'll be selling Sanyo
		remote control VCRs for three
		hundred and ninety—nine dollars? Oh
		no!
			(sings)
		Crazy Charlie...

	He grabs and smashes another fortune cookie.

				CHARLIE
		You'll give away Mitsubishi giant
		screen TVs for twelve hundred and
		ninety—five dollars! Oh no! I'll go
		broke!
			(sings)
		Crazy Charlie...

	He grabs and smashes another cookie.

				CHARLIE
		You won't be undersold on stereos,
		videos, microwaves or blenders!
			(sings)
		Crazy Charlie, Crazy Charlie,
		I'm not breaking cookies,
		I'm smashing prices.
			(rolling his eyes like
		Fabian)
		Crazy Charlie, he insane.

	The waiter hits a big gong.

	Beth laughs.

				PEGGY (0.S.)
		Turn that off.

	INT. PEGGY'S BEDROOM — NIGHT

	CAMERA PULLS BACK from the TV into Peggy's bedroom. Beth gets
	up from the bed and turns off the TV. Peggy enters from the
	adjoining bathroom, wearing a robe, and bobby socks with
	saddle shoes. She picks up a gold Locket from the dresser,
	and puts it on.

				BETS
		When are you going to stop being so
		mad at Dad? How do you think that
		makes me feel?

				PEGGY
		I have a lot of unresolved feelings
		about him. I don't trust him.
		Besides, I hate those commercials.

				BETH
		I'm sorry I asked. We don't have
		time for another heart—to— heart.
		Here, try on the dress.

             Peggy tries on the fifties dress lying on the bed.      

				PEGGY
		But I want you and Scott to
		understand.
			(beat)
		Do you think he loves Janet? Maybe
		he's smashed too many fortune
		cookies.

				BETH
		Come on Mom. Give him a break. He's
		missing the reunion because of you.
		You know he wants to go.

				PEGGY
		Then we'd both have a miserable
		time. What do you think?

	She looks exactly like a sixties teenager.

				BETH
		Hey, you're a hip chick. You look
		like you stepped right out of Life
		magazine. Any time you want to
		borrow it again, just ask.

				PEGGY
		Borrow?! This was my dress.
			(beat)
		Maybe it's a mistake. What if I'm
		the only one? I don't even want to
		go. Everybody's just going to
		say...
			(imitating commercial)
		Hi.. Where's Crazy Charlie?

				BETH
		Mom, lots of people are separated
		and divorced.

				PEGGY
		Not from the guy with the
		lowest prices in town.

	EXT. HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE - NIGHT	

	Couples are walking up the stairs into the school. Peggy and
	Beth are at the bottom of the stairs, staring at the banner
	hung across the entrance.. It reads: WELCOME CLASS OF '60.

				PEGGY
		I feel ridiculous. Maybe I should
		go home and change.

				BETH
		Why are you so nervous? What is the
		matter with you today?

				PEGGY
		I don't know. Reunions do funny
		things to people.

	At that moment they're joined by MADDY.(Madeline) and ARTHUR
	NAGLE, coming up behind them. A typical polyester couple.
	Hellos all around and hugs. Arthur puts his arms around Beth
	and Peggy and leads them up the stairs.

				MADDY
		You two look like that soap
		commercial. Which one's the
		daughter and which one's the
		mother?

				ARTHUR
		You took this seriously. You're a
		real blast from the past.

				PEGGY
		It was Beth's idea.

				MADDY
		I wish I had the nerve. And the
		figure.

				ARTHUR
		You always were a crazy little gal,
		Peg.

				PEGGY
		Arthur, please don't call me Peg.

	INT. SCHOOL HALLWAY — NIGHT

	A large table in the lobby holds plastic nametags. A sign
	reads: LADIES IF YOU CAN'T FIND TOUR TAG, LOOK UNDER YOUR
	MAIDEN NAME. Several people are bending over the table
	looking for their tags. A HOSTESS is sitting behind the
	table. Peggy, Beth, Maddy and Arthur enter. Hellos all
	around.

				PEGGY
		Beth's boyfriend is playing in the
		band.

				MADDY
		It must run in the family.

				BETH
		What does?

				ARTHUR
		You and your mother both seem to
		fall for musicians.

	Maddy and Arthur laugh. Peggy is not amused. The hostess
	hands them their name tags and turns to welcome new arrivals.

	As they proceed down the hallway, Peggy SEES a distinguished
	man enter, RICHARD NORVIK. With him is his pregnant wife
	SHARON. Richard smiles at Peggy. She can't place him. Peggy
	turns back to her group and continues down the hall. The
	fifties MUSIC GETS LOUDER AND LOUDER.

	INT. GYM

	The gym is packed with people dancing, chatting, greeting
	lost friends. A bar is set up at one end. On the walls are
	black and white blow—ups of the 1960 yearbook. On a table is
	a buffet and Peggy' s cake. The BAND is PLAYING and SINGING
	old rock and roll songs. Couples slow dance, jive and stroll.

	Peggy, Beth, Maddy and Arthur enter. Beth leaves the group.

				ARTHUR
		Hey, there's Terry and Leon.

				MADDY
		Peggy, would you find a table?
		We'll see you in a little while.

				PEGGY
		Okay.

	They walk away into the crowd, leaving Peggy alone.

	INT. GYM NEAR WALL

	CL0SE VIEW — A photo of the majorettes. Peggy is in the
	middle, twirling her baton.

	Her reverie is interrupted by:

				RICHARD (0.S.)
		Are you Peggy Sue Kelcher?

				PEGGY
		I was once. Richard!? Richard
		Norvik? I didn't recognize you.

				RICHARD
		You look exactly the same.

				PEGGY
		I just did it for tonight. I don't
		normally dress like this.

				SHARON
		It's adorable.

				RICHARD
		Oh, I'm sorry.. Peggy Sue Kelcher,
		my wife Sharon.

				PEGGY
		Hello. Nice to meet you. Please
		call me Peggy. I'm Peggy Bodell
		now.

				RICHARD
		Where's Charlie? I was in town
		about a year ago and caught one of
		his commercials. Really made me
		laugh.

				PEGGY
		He's not here. We're getting
		divorced.

				RICHARD
		Gee. I'm sorry to hear that.

	NEW VIEW — A large, beefy HAND is THRUST INTO FRAME.

				MAN'S VOICE (0.S.)
		Mr. Norvik.

	CAMERA PULLS BACK TO INCLUDE DOUG SNELL, a paunchy,
	overbearing man, shaking Richard's hand.

				DOUG
		Or, uhh, Richard?  David Snell,
		Merrill Lynch.  I read about the
		Cordex deal in Business Week.
		Congratulations.

				RICHARD
		Thank you, Doug.

				DOUG
		Hi Peggy. How are you? How's
		Char1ie?

	INT. GYM	

	VIEWS ON Carol and Walter. They play a standoffish game, each
	noticing the other, but pretending not to.

	We HEAR and SEE bits of conversations:

				SANDY
			(gleeful)
		I can't believe how she let herself
		go. She was so beautiful in high
		school.

				CAROL
		Everyone's got a gold Rolex. I had
		this one specially made in
		platinum.

	Richard is standing with three men. They hang on his every
	word. Beside them, a very DRUNK MAN overhears:

				RICHARD
		...fifth generation core capacities
		are going to cause another
		shake—out in the smaller companies.

				DRUNK MAN
			(to Richard)
		Your damn computers put me out of
		business. You're a billionaire, and
		I'm a goddamn failure.

	Another man gently restrains the drunk and leads him away.
	Richard is shaken.

	NEW VIEW

	Carol and Peggy.

				CAROL
			(chuckling)
		Welcome to the singles scene.

				PEGGY
		I don't know how you do it. I've
		never even dated anybody but
		Charlie.

				CAROL
		You just have to remember... men
		are like houses and trade
		upwards... I thought you had a
		pretty good marriage.

				PEGGY
		We did for a long time. We just got
		married too young, and ended up
		blaming each other for missing out
		on things.

				CAROL
		So he started having affairs, and
		you got depressed.

	Peggy nods.

				CAROL (CONT'D.)
		You should have left here years
		ago, like I did.

				PEGGY
		It's not the place. I don't buy
		that.
			(melodramatic)
		Trapped in the same town forever.
		The price she would pay for her
		teenage lust.

				CAROL
		After you got knocked up, my mother
		didn't want me to talk to you. She
		thought it was contagious.

				PEGGY
		Oh, it's not so bad. I have two
		wonderful kids, my own business.
			(beat)
		Still, knowing what I know now, if
		I had the chance to do it all over
		again, I'd sure do things a lot
		differently.

				CAROL
		Wouldn't we all.

	INT. GYM OFFICE (ADJACENT TO GYM)

	DOLORES DODGE is about to interview Maddy and Arthur; she
	turns on the tape machine and holds up the microphone.

				DOLORES
		Madeline Hutton and Arthur Nagle
		were high school sweethearts.
		Married right after graduation,
		they're still together. In this day
		and age, that's remarkable...
		Maddy, Arthur, how does it feel to
		have missed the sexual revolution?

				MADDY
			(incensed)
		What kind of question is that? It
		has nothing to do with the reunion.

				ARTHUR
			(thoughtfully — into mike)
		I'm glad you asked, Dolores. Four
		years ago Maddy and I found
		Jesus...

				DOLORES
		Spiritual renewal.. That's what
		reunions are all about. Familiar
		faces, forgotten memories, ancient
		dance steps and music...the great
		time machine.

	INT. GYM

	CAMERA PANS the gym and FINDS:

	Carol dancing with WALTER GETZ, slim, handsome, with a big
	toothy grin. Carol's old high school boyfriend, he's now a
	dentist and a fabulous dancer. They make a great team.
	Couples dancing around them react appreciatively.

				CAROL
		I never could keep up with you.

				WALTER
			(with a quick tap step)
		Just call me Walter the dancing
		dentist. Taps and caps. My
		specialty.

	INT. GYM — ANOTHER AREA

	PEGGY'S TABLE.

	Peggy sits with Richard, Sharon, and two other couples, TERRY
	and LISA and LEON and SANDY.

	A hand gently touches Peggy on the shoulder. Peggy turns
	around and sees ROSALIE TESTA, a small woman with close
	cropped hair. She's in a wheelchair. She wears a plastic
	badge: REUNION COMMITTEE.

				ROSALIE
		I remember that dress.

				PEGGY
		Rosalie Testa!

	'HELLOS' all, around. Peggy helps Rosalie position her
	wheelchair at the table.

				ROSALIE
		I remember when you got that
		locket, too. You were so excited
		I think you showed it to the whole
		school.

				PEGGY
		You have an incredible memory.

				SHARON
		It's beautiful. Does it open?

				PEGGY
		Yes. These are my children. But
		they're not babies anymore.

	INSERT - LOCKET

	Inside are photos of Beth and Scott as babies.

				ROSALIE
			(laughing)
		I think you got married when you
		were three.

	INT. GYM OFFICE	

	Dolores interviewing Walter and Carol.

				DOLORES
		Carol Pritchard Heath and Walter
		Getz were high school steadies who
		went their separate ways. After
		twenty years and four divorces
		between them, they meet again —
		Walter a successful dentist, Carol
		a mature career woman. Carol, why
		did you really come back for this
		reunion?

				CAROL
		Curiosity mostly. I heard you
		finally found a man of your own.
		Too bad he's married.

				WALTER
			(cracking up)
		Whoa! Cat fight! Purse war!

	INT. GYM — PEGGY'S TABLE	

	THEIR POV:

	Dolores walks resolutely towards their table.

	Maddy and. Arthur leave the table as Dolores approaches,
	putting her tape machine on the table. She ignores everyone,
	focusing on Richard.

				DOLORES
		Hello everyone. Richard Norvik? I'm
		Dolores Dodge with KARP Radio.
		Could I have a minute of your time?

				RICHARD
		Sure. I remember you.

	INT. GYM — SERIES OF SHOTS	

	The BAND is PLAYING and SINGING the SONG "GOOD OLD ROCK AND
	ROLL." Peggy and Sharon walk through the gym looking at the
	photo blowups on the wall. Peggy is stopped and hugged by
	several people. Maddy and Arthur are dancing. Despite the
	frantic beat, they are slow dancing. Seth is hanging around
	the stage, bringing a drink to the guitar player. Walter is
	dancing with Rosalie in her wheelchair.

				OVERWEIGHT, BEARDED MAN
		Turns out I love business. Every
		morning I wake up, thank God I'm
		alive, and say Who am I gonna screw
		today?

				LEON
		Let's play "Rate the Moment". I
		give tonight an eighty—seven.
		Better than sex, not as good as
		racquetball.

	INT. GYM OFFICE	

	Dolores has left. Walter lays out lines of cocaine on the
	back of the clipboard, as Carol watches.

				WALTER
		The best thing about being a
		dentist. Pure pharmaceutical grade.
		A couple of lines of this, I can
		drill my own teeth...
			(looks at her for a
		moment)
		Hi.

				CAROL
		Hi.

	INT. GYM — INTERCUT - SERIES OF SHOTS

				SERIOUS MAN
			(to his wife)
		Joe would have enjoyed this. God, I
		still miss him.

				MADDY
			(to Carol)
		Peggy was a mess right after they
		separated, but I think she's coming
		out of it... It seems to be pretty
		friendly now..

				CAROL
		Sometimes it's easier when you hate
		them.

				GREASY DRUNK CREEP
		I can't remember. Did I make it
		with you in high school?

				LISA
		Doesn't it feel like it was
		yesterday?

				TERRY
		Youth is like an amputated leg.
		Long after it's gone, you still
		feel it.

				SAME BEARDED MAN
		My wife's a cow, my son has shit
		for brains, and my daughter's in
		India with Mother Teresa.

				WOMAN
		My husband's a pig. But my son's in
		social work and my daughter, God
		bless her, is in India with Mother
		Teresa.

				LEON
		For the fitness generation, we've
		sure got a lot of porkers.

				SANDY
		I don't remember anything about the
		seventies.

				LISA
		Breaking up was horrible. I said we
		had a very special attachment, he
		said, so does a Hoover.

				LEON
		I don't know why I came back. I
		hated high school.

	The group around him all answer "So did I" or "Me too." 

				ROSALIE
		I enjoyed it.

	INT. GYM NEAR WALL

	Peggy (loose, holding a drink) and Sharon stand in front of a
	PHOTO of the 1960 Cross Country Team.

	VIEW ON PHOTO - off to one side stands MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS.
	His hair is longer, his gaze intense and non—smiling.

				SHARON
		Who's the one with the hair?

				PEGGY
		Michael Fitzsimmons. I had such a
		crush on him.

	Carol and Maddy join them, still panting from dancing.

				CAROL
		Hi, Peggy. God, that Walter Getz	can
		still dance.

				PEGGY
		Your first boyfriend. What do
		you think? Any sparks left?

				CAROL
		Who knows. Remember...
			(a beat)
		Whatever Walter wants...

				CAROL, PEGGY AND MADDY
			(laughing)
		Walter Getz.

				PEGGY
		Sharon Norvik this is Carol Heath,
		and Maddy Nagle. My oldest and
		dearest friends. Sharon's married
		to Richard.

				CAROL
		Lucky lady. Hi.

				MADDY
			(looking at the photo)
		Michael Fitzsimmons! Is he here?

				PEGGY
		No. I asked Rosalie. She couldn't
		track him down.

				CAROL.
		Too bad.

				SHARON
		He must have been quite a guy.

				PEGGY
		He was the only one in high school
		I wished I'd gone to bed with.

				CAROL
		The only one?

				PEGGY
		Well, besides Charlie, of course.

	We HOLD on the photo of Michael and...

					DISSOLVE:

	INT. GYM — LATER

	The BAND is PLAYING AND SINGING the SONG, "JUST BECAUSE."

	Couples axe slow dancing. Dolores is still interviewing
	Richard. Peggy, Sharon and Carol walk back to their table.

				SHARON
		Peggy, would you please rescue
		Richard? Ask him to dance.

				RICHARD
		Are we through Dolores? Good.

				DOLORES
		Well...

	Richard stands and helps Sharon to a chair.

				RICHARD
			(to Sharon)
		You'll be okay?

				SHARON
		Yes. You go ahead.

	Peggy and Richard head onto the crowded floor, and begin to
	dance.

				RICHARD
		The only time people like Dolores
		used to pay any attention to me was
		to laugh at me or insult me. That
		guy, Doug Snell, who shook my hand
		when we walked in, he used to call
		me a four—eyed worm.

				PEGGY
		Well, you showed them. You're rich
		and famous and successful. And you
		have a beautiful wife.

				RICHARD
		You were always friendly to me. I
		appreciated that.
			(beat)
		You know, this used to be a fantasy
		of mine.

				PEGGY
		What was?

				RICHARD
		Dancing with you.

				PEGGY
		You're a sweet man, Richard.

				RICHARD
		I guess part of us never really
		leaves high school.

				PEGGY
		You know, I never told anybody
		this, but I always had a feeling
		that when you die, before you go to
		heaven, you get a chance to fly
		around high school for a while.

	CAMERA PULLS BACK SLOWLY as Peggy and Richard become part of
	the sea of dancers, all Lost in nostalgic reverie.

	BY DOOR

	Charlie enters and stands by the door. He's tentative,
	looking around for his friends. Almost immediately he is
	joined by Arthur, Walter, Terry and Leon. They shake hands,
	glad to see each other.

				TERRY
		Here comes the life of the party.

				LEON.
		I knew you couldn't stay away.

	Everyone's happy to see Charlie. His eyes meet Peggy's he
	gives her a tentative, sheepish wave. Terry looks at the
	band.

				TERRY
		You know, they could've at least
		asked us to sing. We'd refuse, of
		course, but they could've asked us.

	CLOSE ON PEGGY

	Looking at Charlie.

	BY STAGE

	Arthur walks onstage, placing a hatbox on the amplifier. He's
	a Chamber—of—Commerce type.

				ARTHUR
			(into microphone)
		Hello. Can I have your attention,
		please.

	The BUZZ in the room DIMS, Peggy and Richard head back to
	their table.

				ARTHUR
		I know it's getting kind of late,
		and some of you have a long drive
		home, so the reunion committee
		decided it was time for the moment
		you've all been waiting for. You
		don't know what you've been waiting
		for because we didn't tell you, but
		the committee has selected a King
		and Queen. Now don't worry, I took
		care of it so the band's gonna keep
		playing for at least another hour,
		and my old pal Judge Crystal said
		that the bar can stay open as long
		as we want.

	Everyone applauds.

	VIEW ON PEGGY AND CHARLIE

	At opposite ends of the reunion, but aware of each other.

				ARTHUR (CONT'D.)
		And while you're at it, let's have
		a nice big hand for the Little Lady
		that did such a great job
		supervising all the decorations,
		Rosalie Testa.

	More applause. VIEW on Rosalie in her wheelchair.

				ARTHUR
		Now back to business. The members
		of the committee have given this a
		lot of thought and decided on the
		two people who best represent the
		spirit of Buchanan High's Class of
		'60. The king is someone who, in
		more ways than one, has come a
		long, long way since he left here.

	ANGLE - PEGGY'S TABLE

	They all look to Richard, knowing he's the obvious choice.

				ARTHUR
		We're proud to welcome him back,
		Richard Norvik! Come on up here,
		King Richard!

	The band PLAYS a FANFARE and DRUM ROLL. Richard gets up, and
	walks to the stage as everyone APPLAUDS. The band PLAYS a
	chorus of "Get a Job."

	VIEW ON WALTER

				WALTER
			(kidding)
		I demand a recount.
			(laughs)

	VIEW ON STAGE

	Arthur places the gold cardboard crown on Richard's head as
	they shake hands.

				RICHARD
		Sharon and I thank you all for
		making us feel so welcome. It's
		good to be back.

	MORE APPLAUSE as Richard steps back.

				ARTHUR
		Every king deserves a queen. Now,
		we had a Lot at worthwhile
		candidates. And I don't want any of
		you ladies to feel left out, 'cause
		you're all beautiful. But when we
		sent out the invitations, we didn't
		mention anything about this being a
		costume party.

	Peggy's embarrassed reaction, realizing everyone's looking at
	her.

				ARTHUR
		Maybe we should have, 'cause just
		looking at her brings it all back
		for us. Ladies and gentlemen, I
		give you our queen, Peggy Sue
		Kelcher Bodell. Come on up here,
		Peggy Sue.

	The band begins the song PEGGY SUE. Peggy looks pained. She
	doesn't move.

				CAROL
		They're waiting. Come on.

				PEGGY
			(close to tears)
		I can't. It's all too much.

				CAROL
		Go on. You can do it.

	Charlie and Beth stand together: Beth is worried about Peggy.
	CAMERA TRACKS Peggy as she haltingly makes her way to the
	stage. As she does, she notices another blow-up on the wall:

	Peggy and Charlie, as King and Queen of the 1960 prom. Arthur
	gives the crown to Richard who places it on Peggy's head. He
	kisses her cheek and stands back, beaming.

				PEGGY
			(into mike, overwhelmed)
		Thank you.. Thank you very much.

	The lights dim, leaving Peggy in the spotlight. Continued
	APPLAUSE as the singer steps up to his mike and begins to
	SING the song PEGGY SUE.

	PEGGY ON STAGE — INTERCUT WITH HER POV

	People starting to clap and sing along. Carol and Carol's
	POV: a blow—up on the wall of Carol in the senior play.
	Walter and. Walter's POV: a photo of Walter on the basketball
	team. People leaving their tables, surging towards the stage,
	drawn by the music. Maddy and Maddy's POV: a photo of Maddy
	and friends mugging for the camera in the cafeteria. Charlie
	talking to Carol.

	Peggy begins to cry softly. The images begin to melt
	together, pulsing to the music. Peggy is the focus of
	everyone's nostalgia. A wave of time washes over them.

	She remains onstage, looking past the crowd to the photo of
	her and Charlie.

	Peggy onstage, eyes closed, swaying to the music. Walter and
	Carol join hands, walking towards the stage. Rosalie in her
	wheelchair, doing the hand jive, crying.

	The entire crowd swaying to the music, looking to Peggy,
	repeating the chorus over and over.

	Beth notices her mother's state of emotion. Peggy collapses
	onstage. We hear SHOUTS and SCREAMS. Richard, Arthur and
	several others crowd over Peggy. Beth rushes to the stage,
	reaching out to her mother. Charlie too.

	MUSIC STOPS.

	INT. GYM - ECU A THIN TUBE FILLED WITH BLOOD INSERTED

	INTO PEGGY'S ARM - DAY

	CAMERA PULLS BACK to INCLUDE Peggy lying on a cot. She wears
	the same dress she had on at the reunion. She's terrified.
	We NEAR a smattering of background noises: NAMES are CALLED,
	NURSES helping, etc. Looking up she sees: The IV.

	The NURSE taking the IV out of her arm, and placing a vial of
	blood on a tray with several others. Peggy sits up slowly,
	dazed and frightened. She looks at the nurse.

				NURSE
		Would you like your Twinkie now?

	Peggy takes the Twinkie, staring at it blankly. Looking
	around she SEES students giving blood to the Red Cross.
	Several have tubes in their arms. Nurses attend to them.

	Carol sits up drinking a cup of juice, waving weakly at
	Peggy. Maddy, now a brunette, slowly rolls down her sleeve.
	Arthur, Dolores, Walter and several others from the reunion.
	Everyone is younger but instantly recognizable..

	Charlie walks over to Peggy. He grins at her, revealing wax
	vampire fangs in his mouth, hair Brylcreemed to death.

				CHARLIE
		I vant to suck your blood. I also
		vant to suck your Twinkie.

				PEGGY
		Charlie! Am I dead?

				CHARLIE
		No. You are the undead. You will
		live forever if you give me your
		Twinkie.
			(normal voice)
		Come on, let's have it. You hate
		them anyway.

	Mechanically, Peggy hands over the Twinkie. Charlie bends
	over to nuzzle her neck. The nurse's hand COMES INTO FRAME
	and grabs Charlie by the scruff of the neck, pulling him up.

				NURSE
		Young man, stop that.

	The SCHOOL BELL RINGS.

				CHARLIE
		Hey! I just made a deposit in your
		blood bank. Now I want to make a
		withdrawal.

				NURSE
		I think it's time for your next
		class -

				CHARLIE
		I'm changing banks!

	Charlie walks away towards Walter and Arthur. Peggy gazes
	after him, his body blocking her view of a portion of a
	banner hung on the wall. It reads: "Support the Buchanan High
	Blood Drive..." As Charlie exits, the final words come into
	view:

	"Spring 1960." Peggy gasps. She begins to tremble.

				NURSE
		Lie back down and take a deep
		breath.

				PEGGY
		What's going on? Where am I?

				NURSE
		You passed out for a moment.
		Nothing to worry about.

				PEGGY
		How did I get here?

	Maddy and Carol approach, carrying their books.

				NURSE
		Why don't you let your friends help
		you?
			(to Maddy and Carol)
		Take her into the washroom and
		splash some cold water on her face.
		That should perk her up.

				MADDY
		Yes, ma' am.

	They help Peggy up and lead her across the gym.

	INT.  GIRLS' WASHROOM — ADJACENT TO GYM

	The girls enter. Carol immediately lights up a cigarette.
	Peggy crosses to the mirror.

				CAROL
			(to Peggy)
		Wanna smoke?

	That's the worst thing for her.

				PEGGY
		No thanks. I gave them up years
		ago.

	Maddy and Carol react as Peggy takes a closer look at herself
	and the girls' reflections. She places a hand to her throat,
	noticing the locket is gone.

				PEGGY
		Where is it?

				CAROL
		Were taking you back to the nurse.

				PEGGY
		Maddy, what did you do to your
		hair?

	Maddy looks in the mirror.

	INT. SCHOOL HALLWAY - NURSE'S OFFICE

	Maddy and Carol are waiting. Peggy exits the office,
	clutching a note which she hands blankly to Maddy. They walk
	towards the exit, Peggy glued to the wall for support.

				CAROL
		We're going to take you home.

				PEGGY
		That's okay. I'm sure I'll remember
		the way.

	EXT. SCHOOL — SIDE DOOR

	The girls walk outside. Peggy looks around at the old cars i~
	the parking lot. The most noticeable — a blue Chevrolet
	Impala convertible. Peggy stares at it for a beat, shivering
	with recognition, as she follows Carol and Maddy to a 1955
	Ford. Maddy helps Peggy into the back seat.

	EXT. STREET — DRIVING

	Carol drives and chats with Maddy, while in the back seat
	Peggy looks out at the world as it she were on a ride at
	Disneyland. She says things like "That's not here anymore".

	EXT. SUBURBAN STREET - KELCHER HOUSE

	The car pulls up to the curb. Peggy gets out of the car.
	Maddy hands her the note and her books; she twirls her finger
	next to her head.

				CAROL
		I'll call you Later.

				PEGGY
		Yes. Let's stay in touch.

	Peggy walks up to the door, a sleepwalker in suspended
	animation. She waits a beat and knocks softly.

				WOMAN'S VOICE (O.S.)
		Who is it?

				PEGGY
		Peggy.
			(shuddering)
		Peggy Sue.

				WOMAN'S VOICE (0.5.)
		Come on in. It's open.

	Peggy slowly opens the door.

	INT. HALLWAY — KELCHER HOUSE

	Peggy enters and looks down the hallway into the kitchen.
	EVELYN KELCHER is a lovely woman in her mid—forties. She
	turns around from the sink and approaches Peggy.

				PEGGY
			(helplessly)
		Mom!

				MRS. KELCHER
		The nurse called and said you'd be
		coming home.

	Peggy stares blankly at her for a beat, then holds up the
	note, as she moves towards her mother.

				PEGGY
		I have a note.

				MRS. KELCHER
		How do you feel?

				PEGGY
		I'm excused.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Why don't you go lie down for a
		while.

				PEGGY
		Mom!

	Peggy embraces her mother, holding on for dear life, inhaling
	her scent.

				PEGGY
		Chanel Number Five. That always
		reminds me of home.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Of course, dear. You're home now.

				PEGGY
		I'm home now.

	INT. PEGGY'S ROOM

	Peggy enters warily, looking around, a fifties museum of
	teenage artifacts. She walks around the room gently touching
	her old belongings including the record player from opening
	scene. She looks in the mirror to make sure she's still
	there. Suddenly, she turns around.

				PEGGY
		Okay, I'm alone now. Is anyone
		here?

	She opens the closet door expectantly, then closes it shaking
	her head.

				PEGGY
		No. This is crazy. Is somebody
		going to tell me what's going on?
		Why me? What happened? You don't
		have to show up. I don't have to
		see you. Just send me a sign.
			(beat)
		Thanks a lot. 1 guess I'm on my
		own.

	NANCY, Peggy's twelve—year—old sister, peeks in the room.

				PEGGY
		Nancy! Come here.

	Nancy tentatively approaches. Peggy hugs her.

				NANCY
		What are you doing?

				PEGGY
		I'm just happy to see you.

				NANCY
		Come on! Mom said you were sick.
		You're never happy to see me.

				PEGGY
		I'm sorry about that. I really want
		us to be closer. I have enough
		unresolved relationships in my...
		life.

				NANCY
		Teenagers are weird. And you're the
		weirdest.

				PEGGY
		Let's do something together.. Do
		you want to play Monopoly? Or
		Careers... Clue... Snakes and
		Ladders?

				NANCY
			(suspicious)
		Okay, what do you want? What dumb
		favor do you want me to do?

	INT. LIVING ROOM

	On a small black and white TV, Dick Clark introduces a
	spotlight dance. Peggy and Nancy are sitting on the sofa,
	watching. Nancy is eating small candies, like M&M's.

				PEGGY
		It's unbelievable. The man never
		ages.

				NANCY
		Look at Kenny Rossi. Isn't he
		dreamy? I wish he'd break up with
		Arlene. She thinks she's so great.

				PEGGY
		Don't eat the red ones.

				NANCY
		Why not? They're my favorite.

				PEGGY
		They're bad for you. They
		cause...red lips. (red dye *2)

	Nancy react, as Peggy stands. CAMERA TRACKS HER to the den.

	DEN

	Peggy opens the liquor cabinet and takes out a bottle of
	Scotch and a glass, noticing the family photos on the wall..

				PEGGY
		Can't hurt. I'm already dead.

	She belts down several drinks.

				NANCY (Q.S.)
		Peggy Sue! Hurry up. Fabian!

	Peggy steadies herself as CAMERA TRACKS her back into the
	living room.

	LIVING ROOM

	Peggy collapses on the naugahyde recliner. Unexpectedly, it
	leans back, shooting Peggy's legs up.

				MRS. KELCHER
			(from the kitchen)
		I put your laundry on your beds.
		Don't forget to put it away.

				NANCY
		What's for dinner?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Meatloaf.

				NANCY
		Yeech, not again.

	Peggy leans forward in the recliner eating the candies.
	Bemused, she looks at Nancy watching TV and into the kitchen
	where her mother is slapping together meatloaf.

	ANGLE - HALLWAY - THE FRONT DOOR OPENS

	JACK KELCHER Peggy's father, enters the hallway.

				MR. KELCHER
		Girls? Evelyn? Who left this thing
		outside?

	He turns and heads back outside.

				MRS. KELCHER
		What is it?

	Mrs. Kelcher and Nancy follow him outside. Peggy staggers to
	the front door and leans against the door jamb looking out at
	the family.

	EXT. DRIVEWAY

	PEGGY'S POV:

	The family admires a new red and white Edsel.

				MR. KELCHER
		What do you think?

				MRS  KELCHER
			(disturbed)
		Oh, Jack.

				NANCY
		Like wow! Wait till I tell Diane.
		She's always bragging about her
		father's Cadillac.

				MR. KELCHER
		Peggy Sue, what do you think?

				PEGGY
		Oh, Daddy. You were always
		doing things like that.
			(cracking up)
		That's funny! That's really funny.

	She staggers over to the car and falls against it laughing.
	Mr. Kelcher crosses to her and catches a whiff of her breath.

				MR. KELCHER
		Young lady, you're drunk!

				PEGGY
			(laughing)
		Just a little. I've had a tough
		day.

				MR. KELCHER
		I don't see the humor in this. Go
		to your room immediately. You're
		grounded.

				PEGGY
			(tipsy)
		Grounded? Ha! The story of my life.
		I don't wanna go to my room. I
		wanna import Japanese cars. I wanna
		go to Liverpool and discover the
		Beatles.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Jack, take it easy. She gave blood
		at school today. Maybe she's just a
		little light—headed.

				MR. KELCHER
		This is not giving blood. This is
		drunk.

				PEGGY
		Dad, I never knew you had a sense
		of humor.

				MR. KELCHER
		Evelyn, put her to bed.

	INT. PEGGY'S BEDROOM

	Peggy lies in bed, her mother tucking her in.

				MRS. KELCHER
		My little baby. Don't try to grow
		up so fast.

				PEGGY
		Oh Mom, I forgot you were ever so
		young.

	CLOSE ON PEGGY

	She hears her mother walk down the stairs.

				MRS. KELCHER (O.S.)
		A new car. We can't afford a new
		car.

				MR. KELCHER (O.S.)
		Don't worry, it's just a seasonal
		slump.

				MRS. KELCHER (O.S.)
		You have four seasons, you have
		four slumps.

	INT. PEGGY'S BEDROOM - MORNING

	Peggy emerges from the bathroom wearing a towel.

	VIEW FROM BACK

	At a full length mirror she drops the towel and happily
	appraises her eighteen year old body.

				PEGGY
		Let's get physical!... Let's get
		metaphysical!

	Nancy comes in dressed for school.

				PEGGY
		Good morning.

	Nancy goes to Peggy's closet.

				NANCY
		Can I borrow this sweater?

				PEGGY~
		Yeah, but take good care of it.	I'm
		saving it for my daughter.. She
		loves this stuff.

	INT. KITCHEN - MORNING	

	Mr. Kelcher and Nancy sit at the table eating breakfast. Mrs.
	Kelcher stands at the sink scraping toast. Peggy bounces her
	hair in her adult, natural look. "GOOD MORNINGS" all around.

				MRS. KELCHER
		What happened to your hair? You
		have such a pretty face. Why are
		you always trying to cover it up?

				PEGGY
		Oh. I forgot.

	Mrs. Kelcher takes an elastic band from around the faucet and
	hands it to Peggy as she sits at the table. Peggy makes a
	ponytail.

				MRS. KELCHER
		You're looking pretty chipper this
		morning.

				PEGGY
		I'm still here, aren't I?
		I may as well enjoy myself.
		I'm going to go to school
		today.
			(beat)
		Dad, I want to apologize for
		yesterday. The car is a classic.
		Use it in the best of health.

				MR. KELCHER
		Thank you.. I accept your
		apology with the hope that what
		went on yesterday will never
		happen again.

				PEGGY
		That would be impossible.

				MR. KELCHER
		You're so young, this is not the
		time to start acquiring bad habits.

				PEGGY
		Mom, is there any coffee left?

	Mrs. Kelcher begins to pour the coffee, then pulls back,
	spilling some on Mr. Kelcher.

				MRS. KELCHER
		When did you start drinking coffee?

				PEGGY
		Oh.	Ah...recently. All the kids
		drink it.

				MR. KELCHER
		If all the kids jumped off a
		bridge, would you do that too?

				PEGGY
		I think I'm way ahead of them.

				NANCY
		Pass the toast, please.

	Peggy passes Nancy the toast.

				NANCY
		And the butter.

				PEGGY
		You know, you two are wonderful
		parents. I'm really going to try to
		behave myself.

				MR. KELCHER
		Well, at least you stopped calling
		me Daddy—O.

				NANCY
			(correcting him)
		DADDY—o.

				PEGGY
		Mom, sit down for a minute. This is
		so nice, all of us being together
		again like this.

				NANCY
		Can I tell Diane that Peggy Sue got
		drunk or is that a deep family
		secret?
			(silence)
		Well?

				MRS. KELCHER
		How does Diane like her braces?

				R31.NCY
		She hates them. Nobody likes
		braces. Thy just call you junkyard
		face and Miss Metal Mouth. I gotta
		go.

	Nancy jumps up, grabbing her lunch on the counter, as she
	exits. "GOOD—BYES' all around. We HEAR a HORN HONKING outside
	—— a five—note musical phrase —— BE—BOP—A—LU—BOP.

				PEGGY
		Oh yeah. Charlie. How am I going to
		handle him?

				MRS. KELCHER
		What's the matter? Did you two 
		have a fight?.

				PEGGY
		Sort of.

				MRS. KELCHER
		What about?

				PEGGY
		The house payments.

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE 

	Peggy exits the house wincing at the sight of Charlie's car,
	the blue Impala she'd seen the day before. Charlie sits, one
	arm on the wheel, the other over the back of the seat.

				CHARLIE
		How do you feel?

				PEGGY
		Pretty strange.

	Peggy hesitates, unsure how to handle her accumulated
	ambivalence towards Charlie.

				CHARLIE
		Come on. Get in. I can take care of
		that.

	Peggy warily gets in. Charlie leans over to kiss her, but she
	pushes him away. No dice.

				PEGGY
		Not now, Charlie. I've got a
		headache. Get used to the word.
		Roll it around your tongue for a
		years.

				CHARLIE
		Hey, I can take a hint. You look
		great today.

	Charlie starts the car, burns rubber and peels out.

				PEGGY
		You drive like a maniac!

				CHARLIE
		I call this the staccato.
			(does tricks)

	INT. CHARLIE'S CAR — DAY - DRIVING

				CHARLIE
			(earnest)
		Not that I'm glad you were sick,
		but I had a chance to do some
		thinking last night.

				PEGGY
		Oh yeah?

				CHARLIE
		You know. About what we said on
		Tuesday. It makes a lot of sense.

				PEGGY
		Refresh my memory.

				CHARLIE
		How could you forget? We talk about
		seeing other people and you forget?

				PEGGY
		Maybe I blocked it out.

				CHARLIE
		I can understand that.. But please
		don't start crying again.

	EXT. SCHOOL PARKING LOT

	Charlie's car pulls up.

				CHARLIE
		It's not going to be forever. I
		figure three years is long enough.
		I can see it the music pans out.
			(more tentative)
		And right after graduation we
		should start seeing other people.
		Kind of comparison shop before we
		settle down and get married. Know
		what I mean?

				PEGGY
		Why wait?

				CHARLIE
			(surprised)
		Well, we got the prom coming up,
		all these parties. We shouldn't
		upset our parents?

				PEGGY
		They'll learn to live with it.

	Peggy exits the car and heads towards the school. Charlie
	sits, stunned.

	EXT. HIGH SCHOOL LOT

	They are surrounded by friends as they head into school. Near
	the door Walter and Leon are having a contest, hoisting
	themselves onto the sign pole, trying to get their bodies
	parallel to the ground. A crowd urges them on. We SEE taps on
	the bottom of Walter's shoes.

	INT. SCHOOL HALLWAY

	Peggy stands bewildered in the hallway. Charlie walks back,
	takes her by the hand and leads her to a locker.

				CHARLIE
		You're more shook up than you want
		to admit. You'll get used to it,
		we'll still see each other 2, 3
		times a week.

	Charlie opens the locker. Peggy watches carefully, memorizing
	tho combination. He takes out a few books as Peggy notices
	her schedule on the locker door.

				CHARLIE
		Want me to drive you home later?

				PEGGY
		Would you?

				CHARLIE
			(growling)
		Would I?!! Why I oughta...

	Unaccountably, this cracks Charlie up. He walks away
	laughing. Peggy looks completely puzzled. She is surrounded
	by a sea of people, who say hello. She can't remember their
	names.

	INT. CLASSROOM - MORNING

	We SEE Peggy, Maddy, Dolores, Arthur and Carol, singing MY
	COUNTRY TIS OF THEE. They all mumble, except for Peggy who
	delivers a stirring rendition. The class thinks she's crazy.
	Peggy's decided to have a good time. Announcements begin over
	the PA system. No one pays attention, except Peggy.

				MAN'S VOICE (V.0.)
		Good morning, students. This is Mr.
		Mosey. Our girls diving team is
		competing today in the county
		finals at Commander Beck High
		School.
		We know they'll put forth a
		splendid effort — so let's wish
		them luck.

				PEGGY
		Where's Rosalie Testa?

				CAROL
		Probably at the diving meet.

				MAN'S VOICE (V.0.)
		Finally, congratulations go to
		Richard Norvik for placing first in
		the Statewide Math Contest. We're
		proud of you, Richard....That's
		all, students.

	Several students boo Richard's name. The BELL RINGS.

	INT. ANOTHER CLASSROOM

	Maddy, Dolores and Peggy enter the room. Peggy stands at the
	door till most are seated. She sees an empty seat between
	Maddy and Dolores and, assuming it's hers, sits down.

				DOLORES
		Did you study for the test?

				PEGGY
			(horrified)
		Test?

	INT. CLASSROOM - TWENTY MINUTES LATER

	MR. SNELGROVE, an officious little creep, is standing by his
	desk.

				SNELGROVE
		All right, class. Time's up.

	He walks along the aisles collecting the papers. When he gets
	to Peggy he picks up her blank sheet.

				SNELGROVE
		What's the meaning of this, Peggy
		Sue?

				PEGGY
			(patiently)
		Mr. Snelgrove, I happen to know
		that in the future, I will never
		have the slightest use for algebra.
		And I speak from experience.

	The class gasps, a few students APPLAUD, and Mr. Snelgrove's
	jaw drops.

	INT. ANOTHER CLASSROOM — DAY

	MR. GILFOND is teaching The Old Man and the Sea. MICHAEL
	FITZSIMMONS (from reunion cross—country photo) is speaking.
	He always wears black.

				MICHAEL
		Santiago comes back, with nothing
		— there's no meat on the bone. It's
		Hemingway's ego defending itself
		again; he's trying to prove he can
		still perform.

				GILFOND
		...What Hemingway's saying,
		Michael, is that we are alone —
		that when we go out too far we're
		vulnerable. The irony, that
		Santiago is beaten by the sharks,
		doesn't make him less of a hero.

	THE BELL RINGS. The class begins to exit.

				GILFOND
		Over the weekend read the first
		four chapters of The Great Gatsbv.
		I hope you enjoy it.

	Peggy hesitates. She walks up to Gilfond.

				PEGGY
		Mr. Gilfond, can I talk to you?

				GILFOND
		Sure, Peggy Sue. What's on your
		mind?

				PEGGY
		I just wanted to tell you how much
		I enjoy your class. You taught me a
		lot and... you're a very fine
		teacher.

				GILFOND
		That's very kind of you. Thank you.

				PEGGY
		Thank you. Um, I also think you're
		underpaid.

	LUNCH AREA

	Walter, Charlie and Arthur sit at a long table.

				WALTER
		Why does your father take inventory
		on Sunday night? That's poker
		night. You always got out of it
		before.

				CHARLIE
		I've got to string him along for a
		while. It's for his own good.

				ARTHUR
		But you're not going into his
		business. When're you going to tell
		him?

				CHARLIE
		Soon. I can't tall everybody
		everything all at once.

	Peggy, Carol and Maddy walk over and sit down with trays.
	Peggy deliberately avoids the empty sear next to Charlie.
	They're uneasy with each other. Peggy looks with disgust at
	the slop on the tray.

				WALTER
		Strange rumors are sweeping the
		school about you.

				PEGGY
			(wary)
		What do you mean?

				WALTER
		Prom what I hear, you really gave
		it to old Smellgrove.

				MADDY
		I was there. She told the creep off
		right to his face.

				ARTHUR
		Atta girl, Peg.

				PEGGY
		Arthur, please don't call me Peg.

				ARTHUR
		Why I oughta...

	Charlie, Walter and Arthur crack up.

				PEGGY
		I don't get it.

				CAROL
		That's because you' re not a total
		moron like they are.

				MADDY
		It's some stupid old movie thing
		they just started.

				WALTER
		That's enough out of you, little
		lady.

				CHARLIE
		I'll throw the book at you!

				ARTHUR
		Why I oughta...

	The boys crack up again. The girls think they're hopeless.
	Peggy SEES Michael Fitzsimmons, buried in a book. He looks at
	Peggy with a penetrating gaze, then back down.

	Richard Norvik, also sitting alone, working with a slide
	ruler on a book of mathematical puzzles, dressed in early
	Nerd.

	Peggy gets up from the table. She looks back to Charlie and
	the table.

				PEGGY
		I'll be right back.

	CAMERA TRACKS PEGGY TO RICHARD

	ANOTHER ANGLE

				WALTER
		She's not wasting any time. Peggy
		Sue and Mr. Square Root?

				CHARLIE
		He's a nice guy. You know he's
		writing a book?

				WALTER
		Oh, a book... Excuse me for a
		second.
			(fakes gagging)

	ANOTHER ANGLE

	Peggy stands over Richard. He looks up nervously, pushing his
	glasses up the bridge of his nose, a constant habit.

				PEGGY
		Congratulations on the math
		contest, Richard.

				RICHARD
		It really wasn't that difficult.

	Doug Snell (of Merrill—Lynch, at the reunion) walks past.

				DOUG
		What're you doing, Peggy Sue?
		Fishing for four—eyed worms?

				PEGGY
		Get lost you macho shmuck.

	Doug and Richard react.

				PEGGY
		I have to talk to you. It's very
		important.

				RICHARD
		I'm not doing any tutoring this
		year. I'm too busy.

				PEGGY
		It's not that. Can we meet after
		school? Please?

				RICHARD
		All right. I'll be in the physics
		lab. Make it four—thirty. I have a
		rocket club meeting.

	INT. CLASSROOM - A FAMILY LIVING CLASS

	On the walls are several charts: Basic Food Groups, Tips on
	Grooming, and prominently displayed, The Happy Home
	Corporation, i.e. husband as president, wife, vice—president,
	children, employees, grandparents as board members. MISS OTTO
	stands by her desk. Standing in the front of the room is:

				MADDY
		Therefore, the key to a successful
		children's party can be summed up
		in one word — planning.. With
		proper planning, a successful,
		inexpensive happy birthday party
		can be had by all. Including the
		mother.

	She walks back to her seat.

				MISS OTTO
		That was very comprehensive,
		Madeline. Thank you.. Now...
			(beat)
		Peggy Sue, your topic was 'How To
		Choose A Nursery School.' Are you 
		prepared?

				PEGGY
		All.... Okay. Sure.

	Peggy walks to the front and faces the class, smiling primly.

				PEGGY
		Choosing a good nursery school can
		be one of the most important
		decisions you can make. It will
		often determine your child's
		attitude towards education and
		schooling.
			(proud of herself)
		Of course, the lessons learned are
		primarily social —— sharing, being
		considerate of others.
			(remembering)
		And they're so cute when they're
		little. They bring you back their
		Little masterpieces every day and
		you put 'em on the refrigerator
		door. They're so proud, and their
		names are all misspelled. Scott
		would always print his S backwards,
		and Beth would make her sweet
		little flowers...

	Peggy wipes away a tear. At the stunned reaction of the class
	and Miss Otto.

	EXT. PLAYING' FIELD

	The baseball team practices. Michael Fitzsimmons runs laps
	with the track team. One lone boy kicks a soccer ball.

	CLOSE - A BATON	TWIRLING IN THE AIR

	WIDEN to INCLUDE the baton spinning down, falling into the
	hands of a uniformed majorette who deftly passes it through
	her legs and twirls it back into the air. Another baton — it
	rises, spinning awkwardly and falls through Peggy's hands
	onto the ground. Six MAJORETTES in uniform are practicing.
	Dolores is one of them.

				DOLORES
			(to Peggy)
		What a girl. What a twirl. You
		know, Peg—Leggy, you're gonna get
		demoted to hall monitor -

				HEAD MAJORETTE
		Come on, Peggy Sue.. Try it again.
		You haven't been practicing.

	Peggy gamely tries it again and manages at least to catch the
	baton and continue twirling. She continues, enjoying herself.
	Michael runs by, the lonely long distance runner.

	EXT. PLAYING FIELD — LATER

	The group of majorettes heads toward the school. Peggy sees
	Charlie leaning against the car, waving her over.

				CHARLIE
		Looking good out there.

				PEGGY
		Thanks.

				CHARLIE
		I noticed you were giving me the
		silent treatment at lunch. I guess
		I deserved it. I've been thinking
		about my three year plan and I
		think it's unworkable. I must have
		been delirious.

				PEGGY
		I thought it had a lot of merit.

				CHARLIE
		In the abstract maybe. Get a grip
		on yourself! But when I imagine you
		going out with other guys, I
		feel... ah...

				PEGGY
		Rejected, worthless, miserable.

				CHARLIE
		Yeah. Like that.

				PEGGY
		Good.

	Peggy turns, and walks away. Charlie looks miserable.

	INT. PHYSICS LAB	

	Peggy enters and approaches Richard. He is too engrossed
	constructing an elaborate kite to notice her.

				PEGGY
		What a great kite.

				RICHARD
		I'm writing a book on kite
		construction. What did you want to
		talk about?

				PEGGY
		I want to ask you a question.
			(beat)
		Do you think...time travel is
		possible?

				RICHARD
		Are you doing some kind of science
		project?

				PEGGY
		Sort of.

				RICHARD
		Well... in a Newtonian framework,
		the possibilities were limited, but
		with the advent of relativity
		theory, the idea of absolute time
		can no longer be reasonably
		affirmed.

	Peggy hasn't understood a word.

				RICHARD
		And then, there's Richard's
		Burrito.

				PEGGY
		What's that?

				RICHARD
		That's my own theory based on a
		Mexican food called the burrito.
		I had it once when my parents took
		me to Disneyland.

				PEGGY
		I	know what a burrito is.

				RICHARD
		Well, I think time is like a
		burrito. Sometimes it just folds
		over on itself and one part touches
		the other.

				PEGGY
		What's inside?

				RICHARD
		You can till it with whatever you
		want. From illusions to memory,
		from experience to innocence, from
		happiness to the entire universes

				PEGGY
		So you think time travel is
		possible? For people?

				RICHARD
		Absolutely. People, dogs,
		elephants.

				PEGGY
		Listen, you've gotta keep this a
		secret. You can't tell a soul.
		Promise?

				RICHARD
		Okay. I promise.

				PEGGY
		This is serious. Nobody can know.
		Ah, I've returned from the future.
		I traveled back here 25 years.

				RICHARD
		You probably are crazy. Wait a
		minute. Is this some kind of joke?
		I know what you all, think of me.

				PEGGY.
		No. Really. You're the smartest
		person I know. It sounds
		unbelievable. But I can prove it.

				RICHARD
		Oh yeah?

				PEGGY
		You have a blind grandfather. One
		day you're going to invent a
		machine that reads books for blind
		people. I read about it. You're
		going to be famous. You're going to
		invent a lot of things.

				RICHARD
		How, did you know about my
		grandfather?

				PEGGY
		Because I'm telling you the truth.
		I know what's going to happen.
		There's going to be test tube
		babies and heart transplants. And
		an American named Neil Armstrong is
		going to walk on the moon. On July
		20, 1969.

				RICHARD
		Holy Toledo! That's six years
		ahead of schedule!

	EXT. STREET

	Peggy and Richard are walking, carrying their books.

				RICHARD
		But when did you leave? Are you
		here until then? Were you there
		until now? What direction are you
		going in? Are you a moving point on
		an infinite line extending into the
		past? Can anyone do it?

				PEGGY
		I don't know.

	Oblivious, Peggy and Richard walk by Shower's Cafe. Inside,
	Dolores and Carol see them.

	EXT. ANOTHER STREET — APPROACHING RICHARD'S HOUSE

				RICHARD
		I'd be very careful if I were you.
		You don' t want to fall into the
		clutches of some madman with plans
		to manipulate your brain.

				PEGGY
		That's why I was getting a
		divorce..
			(beat)
		What I really think is that I had a
		heart attack at the reunion and
		died.

	EXT. RICHARD'S DRIVEWAY

				RICHARD
		You look pretty good for a corpse.

				PEGGY
		Come on, Richard, I'm serious.

				RICHARD
		You're giving me the creeps.

				PEGGY
		Am I dead or not?

				RICHARD
		There's one way to find out.

	Richard stops and throws down his books. He steps in front of
	Peggy, throwing down her books, dragging her to the curb.

				PEGGY
		What're you doing?

				RICHARD
		Confucious says, The way out is
		through the door. There's a truck.
		There's your door.

	A large truck speeds towards them.

				RICHARD
		Step in front of the truck! If
		you're dead, it won't matter. The
		truck'll go right through you. Go
		ahead! You're dead!

	Peggy takes one step off the curb. The truck is getting
	closer. The truck BLOWS A LOUD SUSTAINED WAIL.

				PEGGY
		No! I don't want to die!

	INT. RICHARD'S GARAGE

	A completely outfitted laboratory, kites decorate the walls.

				RICHARD
		Okay, you're not dead, but
		according to every law of science
		what you say happened to you is
		impossible.

				PEGGY
		What if it's beyond science? What
		it it's God?

				RI CHARD
		Einstein said "God doesn't play
		dice with the universe." I'm a
		scientist. I believe that there's
		an order to things. Why would God
		bring you back as a high school
		girl?

				PEGGY
		I don't know.

				RICHARD
		You're a molecule in chaos, a
		discontinuent aberration. Maybe
		you've just got powers of
		precognition. Well, maybe you're
		just out of whack.

				PEGGY
		I told you, I've already lived my
		life. I don't know how or why I'm
		here, but you have to help me get
		back. I want to get back to my real
		life!

				RICHARD
		All right, I'll work on it, I'll,
		do some research. But in the
		meantime, don't get crazy.

				PEGGY
		I'm trying. I'll see you tomorrow.
			(heads out the door)

				RICHARD
		What if you're not here tomorrow?

	INT. KELCHER HALLWAY

	Peggy comes home, enters hallway.

				MRS. KELCHER (O.S.)
		This necklace is sapphire, it was
		my Grandmother's.

	Peggy Looks into the living room.

	PEGGY'S POV:

	Her mother is sitting on the sofa with a strange MAN in a
	suit. She's served him tea. There are several, pieces of old
	jewelry spread on a cloth on the coffee table. The man is
	examining one of the pieces. Mrs. Kelcher seems surprised
	that Peggy's home from school.

	Peggy moves on into the kitchen.

	INT. KELCHER KITCHEN

	Peggy hears her mother let the man out. She enters the
	kitchen.

				PEGGY
		Who was that man?

				MRS. KELCHER
		It was nobody. Ah... he's a poll,
		taker. I'm thinking of voting
		Democrat this year. But don't
		mention it to your father. How was
		school today?

				PEGGY
		It was great to see everybody
		again. But it's so boring and
		regimented. Most of what they teach
		is useless. The worst thing was
		lunch.

	The TELEPHONE RINGS.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Would you get that, dear?

				PEGGY
		Sure, Mom.
			(picking up the phone)
		Hello.

	Peggy gasps. Mrs. Kelcher turns to her.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Peggy! What's the matter? Who is
		it?

				PEGGY
			(shaken)
		It's Grandma. I can't talk to her
		now.
			(into phone)
		I'm sorry, Grandma.

	Peggy hands the receiver to her mother and runs out of the
	room sobbing. Her first confrontation with mortality.

	INT. HALLWAY

	Peggy climbs the stairs, in tears.

				MRS. KELCHER (O.S.)
		Peggy Sue! What is it?

	Forcing herself to regain her composure, she sits down at the
	top of the landing as Mrs. Kelcher joins her.

				MRS. KELCHER
		What happened to you?

				PEGGY
		I had a dream that Grandma died.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Well, she is getting on, but she's
		fine. I told her you weren't
		feeling well yesterday. She called
		to find out how you are.

				PEGGY
		She did? I love her so much, and I
		haven't seen her in such a long
		time. And Grandpa Barney. Is he
		all, right?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Yes, he's fine, too. You saw them
		at Easter.

				PEGGY
		I'm sorry, Mom. I'll call Grandma
		back and apologize.

				MRS. KELCHER
		That's a good girl... I hate to see
		you so upset.
			(beat)
		Tell me, sweetheart. Are you having
		problems with Charlie? You
		mentioned something this morning.

				PEGGY
		I'm confused about a lot of things
		right now. Charlie's only one of
		them.

	Two beats.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Is Charlie pressuring you to do
		things you don't think you should
		be doing?

				PEGGY
		What do you mean?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Peggy, do you know what a penis is?
			(Peggy's jaw drops)
		Stay away from it.

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE — NIGHT

	Charlie pulls up to the curb, opens the glove compartment,
	extracts a can of Old Spice aerosol, sprays the seat; and
	exits his car, throwing a kiss to it as he walks up to the
	door.

	CLOSER VIEW

	He's wearing a hideous orange and turquoise sweater.

	INT. KELCHER HOUSE — HALLWAY

	Mr. Kelcher opens the door, Charlie enters.

				MR. KELCHER
		Hello, Charlie.

				CHARLIE
		Hello, sir. How are things at the
		hat store?

				MR. KELCHER
		Fine, thanks. Come on in. I want to
		talk to you.

	CAMERA TRACKS Charlie and Mr. Kelcher into the living room.
	Mr. Kelcher sits on his recliner, Charlie, nervous, on the
	couch. Nancy is on the rug, studying.

				MR. KELCHER
		You may have noticed that Peggy
		Sue's been acting a little strange
		lately.

				NANCY
		She's distorted.

				CHARLIE
		Yes, sir.

				MR. KELCHER
		She seems confused, irresponsible,
		overemotional. My wife says that's
		the way girls act sometimes.

				NANCY
		She's almost a juvenile delinquent.

	Mr. Kelcher gives Nancy a look and points to the door.
	Without her father noticing, Nancy creeps up behind him and
	makes rabbit ears behind his head. Charlie tries hard not to
	laugh. Nancy continues to clown.

				CHARLIE
		Yes, sir. But that's what I like
		about her. She's not like all the
		other girls at school.

				MR. KELCHER
		Charles, in spite of your
		adolescent infatuation with music,
		we've always regarded you a a fine
		young man. We've trusted you with
		our daughter.

				CHARLIE
		Yes, sir. Trust is a two—way
		street. In the past two years I've
		been pleased to note that you and
		Mrs. Kelcher have, uh, fulfilled
		your sacred trust of being good
		parents to the, uh, woman I plan to
		take off your hands.

	Mr. Kelcher looks as if he's witnessing the latest attack of
	teenage weirdness.

	INT. PEGGY'S BEDROOM

	Peggy is changing a record. She sees the dress she was
	wearing the day before (and at the reunion) slung across a
	chair. As Peggy picks it up, a book of matches falls out.
	Peggy picks it up, excited.

	INSERT: MATCHBOOK which reads: FINISH HIGH SCHOOL IN YOUR
	SPARE TIME. Peggy frantically searches the dress pockets and
	slowly draws out two joints. She stares at them for a beat.

				PEGGY
			(worrying)
		Oh, Beth.

	There's a knock at the door. Peggy quickly hides the joints.
	Mrs. Kelcher opens the door.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Charlie's downstairs. Why aren't
		you ready?

				PEGGY
		For what?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Maddy's party.

				PEGGY
		I don't feel very festive.

				MRS. KELCHER
		You accepted an invitation, Maddy's
		one of your best friends, and I
		baked the Rice Krispie squares.

	Peggy laughs.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Enjoy yourself! This is the best
		time of your life. And the sooner
		you learn to handle Charlie the
		better. Get dressed.

	Mrs. Kelcher closes the door.

	INT. LIVING ROOM

				MR. KELCHER
		We think this party might cheer
		her up. Just make sure you know
		what's expected of you.

				CHARLIE
		What would that be, sir?

				MR. KELCHER
		Show her a good time, but for God's
		sake restrain yourself.

				CHARLIE
			(surprised)
		Of course.

	ANGLE ON PEGGY

	walking downstairs, surprised by Charlie and Dad talking.

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE - NIGHT	

	Peggy and Charlie exit and walk towards his car. Peggy's
	holding a pan of Rice Krispie squares. Charlie slips Peggy's
	sweater back on her shoulder. He's trying hard to make up.

				PEGGY
		Where did you get that sweater?

				CHARLIE
		Great, isn't it?

				PEGGY
		It's really Fifties. You sort of
		clash with the world.

				CHARLIE
		Hey! What's the fun of being a
		teenager if you can't dress weird?
		And we're going to have fun
		tonight, right?

				PEGGY
		Right. I promised my mother.

	INT. CHARLIE'S CAR — NIGHT - DRIVING

				CHARLIE
		Is this slow enough for you?

				PEGGY
			(serious)
		Charlie, how are you?

				CHARLIE
		I'm fine Peggy Sue. And how are
		you? Are we talking on the phone?
		Are we pen pals?

				PEGGY
		Seriously. What's it like to be
		eighteen?

	Charlie looks thoughtful, then guns the engine.

				CHARLIE
		It's great. I cleaned the car, do
		you like it? Oh, I got tickets for
		Fabian on your birthday, you like
		him, right? He's cool. Eighteen is
		half of thirty six. It's "Gentlemen
		start your engines", vroom, like
		I'm gassed up ready for the race.
		I've got the girl, I've got the
		car, I've got the talent, but I
		don't know. Do I date, get married,
		join the army, cut a record, go to
		college? I got a million choices,
		but nobody teaches you how to
		choose. But it's different for a
		girl. You're Lucky. You just have
		to wait for me.

	INT. MADDY'S HOUSE — BASEMENT

	Thirty kids are dancing, talking, snacking. One couple makes
	out. Walter, Leon, Terry and Doug Snell are crowded around a
	TV, watching an old western with Eugene Pallette or Edgar
	Buchanan. The boys laugh as Pallette or Buchanan growls a
	western cliche.

				DOUG
		Gol'darnit, dag nab it, dad burn
		it, dad blame it.

	INT. MADDY'S HOUSE — HALLWAY TO BASEMENT

	Charlie and Peggy are poised at the door.

				CHARLIE
		Here comes the life of the party.

	INT. MADDY'S HOUSE — BASEMENT

	Arthur and a few others stand by the bar, where bottles of
	Coke are lined up. Arthur carefully pours rum from a hip
	flask directly into the bottles. Peggy and Charlie enter.

				LEON
		Goes down, smooth. Hey, look what
		the cat dragged in.

				CHARLIE
		Have no fear. Charlie's here.

				WALTER
		Oh, it's you is it.

				TERRY
		Jumping Jehosophat!

				DOUG
		It's a miracle!

				PEGGY
		Hi, guys.

				ARTHUR
		Now that's a purty little heifer.

				CHARLIE
		Why Pete's the best darn cook on
		the Panhandle!

				PEGGY
		Why I oughta!

	The boys all crack up.

	THE PARTY — LATER

	Walter, Leon, Charlie and Terry crowd around Arthur who has
	an open, wide—mouthed bottle of beer in his hand.

				CHARLIE
		Ready. Set. Go -

	Arthur rapidly chug—a—lugs the entire beer and immediately
	recites from memory as the boys urge him on:

				ARTHUR
			(going: for speed)
		Hi—Yo Silver! A cloud of dust, a
		galloping horse with the speed of
		light, a hearty Hi-Yo Silver! The
		Lone Ranger! With his faithful
		Indian companion Tonto, the daring
		and resourceful Masked Rider of the
		Plains came to Earth with powers-
		and abilities far beyond those of
		mortal men.
		Return with us now to those
		thrilling days of yesteryear - from
		out of the...

	Arthur lets out a huge belch. Everybody cracks up.

				LEON
		You doorknob! You threw in
		Superman!

				CHARLIE
		Too bad. Close to a record.

				ARTHUR
			(foaming at the nose)
		I hate it when the beer comes out
		my nose.

	ANOTHER AREA

	Peggy, Carol and Maddy bemusedly watching the boys.

				MADDY
		Can you believe I want to marry
		that dork.

				CAROL
		Why do guys do such stupid things?

				PEGGY
		You know, I never could figure that
		one out.

	INT. BASEMENT - ANOTHER ANGLE

	Maddy, Arthur, Walter, Carol, Charlie and Peggy sit on a
	couch. Maddy and Carol sit in their boyfriends' laps. Peggy
	sits distractedly on the couch arm. They cross talk — boys to
	boys — girls to girls.

				MADDY
		I was thinking of four ushers and
		four bridesmaids.

				WALTER
		The Yanks got the hitting but the
		Sox got the defense.

				CAROL
		What are your colors, going to be?

				ARTHUR
		I'l1 take Kubek and Richardson
		over Fox and Aparicio.

				MADDY
		I'm thinking of pink and green.

	ANOTHER ANGLE

	Dolores and Terry standing in a corner kissing passionately.

				MADDY (CONT'D.)
		Look at Dolores. What a tramp.

				CHARLIE
		Pitching wins pennants. The Tigers
		got four potential twenty game
		winners.

				CAROL
		You'd be surprised at how many
		girls in school aren't virgins.

				WALTER AND ARTHUR
			(to Carol)
		Like who?

				CHARLIE
		Don Mossi, Frank Lary, Jim Sunning
		and Paul Foytack.

	INT. BASEMENT — LATER

				ARTHUR
		And now, direct from three weeks of
		rehearsal in Walter's garage, four
		guys who have dedicated their lives
		to becoming the greatest singing
		group in the world... (beat)
		Charlie, Walter, Leon and Terry.
		The Definitions.

	Applause as the group enters from the furnace room. They all
	wear black pants and iridescent sharkskin jackets. Charlie is
	in the center of the group as they position themselves.

				CHARLIE
		One, two, three-...

	The group begins to SING an A CAPELLA version of RAMA LAMA
	DING DONG (or I WONDER WHY). Charlie sings lead, backed up by
	the other three. Walter dances insane, Temptation—like steps.
	The crowd huddles around them, clapping and grooving. Peggy
	is on the planet of lost innocence, removed and melancholy.

				CAROL
		Charlie really has a great voice.

				MADDY
		Maybe they'll be the next Dion and
		the Belmonts.

				PEGGY
		Don't get your hopes up.

				MADDY
		Come on, where's your enthusiasm?

	Charlie SINGS directly to Peggy, grinning at her. In spite of
	herself, she smiles back at him. She's starting to realize
	why she fell in love with him. He's irresistible.

				PEGGY
		He is kind of cute, isn't he?

				CAROL
		Yeah. You're so lucky. He really
		loves you, too. He's always telling
		Walter how wonderful you are.

				PEGGY
		He does?

	The group finishes the song. Charlie blows Peggy a kiss. The
	crowd APPLAUDS, including Peggy. Dolores joins Peggy, Carol
	and Maddy.

				DOLORES
		Carol and I saw you with that
		creep, Richard, today.

				PEGGY
		First of all, Richard is not a
		creep. He happens to be an
		exceptional person. If any of you
		gave him half a chance, you'd find
		that out.

				DOLORES
		God, Peggy, you're so unformed
		you're practically fetal. You're
		just taking pity on him 'cause he
		has no friends.

				PEGGY
		Dolores, can't you be a little
		kinder to people? You don't even
		know the boy. If you weren't so
		neurotic and insecure, maybe you'd
		shut up for a while and show some
		compassion.

				DOLORES
		Are you for real?

				PEGGY
		Touchy, touchy!

	Dolores storms away.

				MADDY
			(to Peggy)
		I don't know what you said to her,
		but I wish I'd said it.

	Charlie and Walter walk over and accept "BRAVOS" from the
	girls. Walter does his James Dean imitation.

				PEGGY
		Charlie, what do you think of
		Richard Norvik?

				CHARLIE
		Is he gonna help you with that
		physics stuff?

				PEGGY
		He's trying.

				CHARLIE
		Hey! Who needs physics when
		we've got chemistry?

				PEGGY
			(charmed)
		Come on, let's dance.

				WALTER
		Put on some make—out music, and
		kill the lights.

	We HEAR a RECORD SCRATCH. A slow song begins. The lights are
	dimmed. Coupler begin to slow dance. Charlie holds Peggy
	close, barely moving. Peggy is misty—eyed, moved by being in
	Charlie's arms again.

				CHARLIE
		There isn't a girl in school that
		can hold a candle to you..

				PEGGY
		You're pretty charming when you
		want to be.

				CHARLIE
		Yeah I know.  But I don't have to
		flatter you.  It just feels right. 
		You're the perfect girl for me.  As
		in is, was and always will be.  I'm
		glad dancing was invented.  You
		know the first dances were rituals. 
		Like fertility rites.

	As they dance Charlie gets embarrassed by an erection, and
	moves his hips away from Peggy.  She surprises him by
	grabbing his tush and pulling him into her.

	INT. MADDY'S BASEMENT - LATER

	MUSIC FADES INTO the song "PARTY DOLL" by Buddy Knox.

	Peggy is doing the Twist, showing Charlie and several others. 
	Walter gets the hang of it, twisting on one leg.  Carol tries
	to keep up.  Maddy and Arthur are always a beat behind.

				DOLORES
		Hey Terry, what is that?  Did Peggy
		make it up?  I've never seen that
		on Bandstand.

				TERRY
		What if we're witnessing the end of
		touch dancing?

	INT. CHARLIE'S CAR - DESERTED LANE - NIGHT

	The windows are fogged.  Peggy and Charlie kiss tenderly.

				PEGGY
		Mmm. This is nice.  I always loved
		the way you kiss.  I missed you.

				CHARLIE
		Your eyes look like silver pools of
		moonlight.  And the tide rushes in.

				PEGGY
		You really love me, don't you?

				CHARLIE
		You know I do.  I even wrote you
		into my will.

				PEGGY
			(tentatively)
		Charlie, let's make love.

				CHARLIE
		What?! You mean sex?! Intercourse?
			(non—believing)
		You want to have intercourse! Last
		weekend you said... What time is
		it?

				PEGGY
		A lot's happened since last
		weekend.

				CHARLIE
		But you're the one who wanted to
		wait till we got married. And you
		were right. We should wait.

				PEGGY
			(f1ustered)
		I probably meant it when I said it.
			(beat; coyly)
		Doesn't Lucky Chuckie want to come
		out?

				CHARLIE
		Who?

	Peggy starts to GIGGLE, realizing the absurdity of the
	situation. The more she GIGGLES, the more agitated Charlie
	gets. Peggy starts to unbutton Charlie's shirt.

				PEGGY
		You know. Your love machine... the
		throbbing thrill hammer... your
		thing!

				CHARLIE
		You mean my wang? Listen, it's
		running real late.

	Charlie pushes her away, angry..

				CHARLIE
		What is this? What the hell is
		going on? One week you say, "If you
		love me you won't", now you say "If
		you love me you will".
			(beat)
		Excuse me. That's a guy's line!

	Peggy realizes she's blown it. Charlie isn't ready for this.

				PEGGY
		This is a mistake. We better
		forget it.

				CHARLIE
		You're damn right! Jesus! Peggy!
		You sure know how to spoil a mood.

	Charlie straightens himself up, starts the car and burns out.

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE — NIGHT

	Charlie drops her off.

				PEGGY
		I'm sorry Charlie.

				CHARLIE
		Save it.

	Peggy watches him go. Looking at her darkened house, she
	turns and walks down the street.

	EXT. STREET — SHOWER'S CAFE

	Peggy peeks in the window. The kids from the party are eating
	and laughing. Rosalie Testa is dancing. Shaken by Rosalie,
	she turns away. In the distance she SEES the lights of:

	ART'S DONUT HOLE. OPEN 24 HOURS.

	INT. ART'S DONUT HOLE	

	A few people linger over coffee. The waitress serving them is
	Monica (the same but younger woman from LOVIN' OVEN).

	In a corner, Michael Fitzsimmons, in a red leather jacket,
	sits alone, reading. He looks up to check on his motorcycle
	parked outside. He's splendid in his isolation.

	Peggy enters, taking a seat at the counter, startled to see
	Monica, who doesn't know her.

				MONICA
		What would you like?

				PEGGY
		Monica? Aren't you Monica Hines?

				MONICA
		Yes. Who are you?

				PEGGY
		Ah... never mind. Can I have a
		coffee, please? And a cinnamon
		cruller.
			(sotto)
		How's Bobo?

	Peggy notices Michael staring at her. Peggy smiles, Michael
	doesn't. Monica brings Peggy her coffee and donut.

				MONICA
		Twenty cents, please.

				PEGGY
		You're kidding?

	Picking up her donut and coffee, she walks over to Michael's
	table and sits opposite him.

				PEGGY
		I was impressed with what you said
		in English class today.

				MICHAEL
		Gilfond's okay, except he thinks
		Hemingway's great Literature.

				PEGGY
		You don't?

				MICHAEL
			(contemptuously)
		He's a fisherman! The most
		overrated writer of the century. I
		mean, he's the perfect American
		author — fat, violent, drunk...

				PEGGY
		Maybe you're confusing his life
		with his work.

				MICHAEL
		A writer's life is his work. Jack
		Kerouac doesn't have to kill a bull
		to have something to write about.
		He's out there feeling, burning...
		grooving on life!

	Michael leans back in his chair. He's said his piece. Peggy
	studies him for a beat.

				PEGGY
		The young man leaned back in his
		chair. No bulls would die today.

				MICHAEL
		What're you doing here anyway?

				PEGGY
		Coffee and a donut.

				MICHAEL
		I thought chicks like you traveled
		in packs.

				PEGGY
		Hey, man, I'm a hip chick.

	EXT. ART'S DONUT HOLE

	Long shot of the brightly lit donut shop. Michael and Peggy
	are clearly visible.

	INT. CAR

	Dolores and Terry are driving by.

				DOLORES
		Terry, slow down.

				TERRY
		Okay.

				DOLORES
		Terry! Slow down.

				TERRY
		What, why?

	EXT. ART'S DONUT HOLE — DOLORES'S POV:

	Peggy and Michael leave the donut shop, get on Michael's
	motorcycle.

				DOLORES
		There's Peggy with Michael
		Fitzsimmons.

				TERRY
		That commie beatnik? What's she
		doing with him? Wait'll I tell
		Charlie.

				DOLORES
		First a nerd and then a weirdo.
		What a bunch of nose pickers. I'll
		tell Charlie.

	EXT. STREET - NIGHT — DRIVING

	Peggy on Michael's bike, clasped around him. Her eyes closed,
	enjoying the wind blowing in her hair. They head out of town.

	EXT. GAS STATION

	Michael pumps gas. Peggy walks to the washrooms. Looking
	around she waits a beat, then enters the men's.

	INT. MEN'S WASHROOM

	With all the aplomb of a divorcee, Peggy takes a quarter and
	deposits it in a condom machine. She puts the packet in her
	skirt pocket, pulls out the joints and stares at them for a
	beat. She checks her hair in the mirror and exits.

	EXT. GAS STATION

	Michael pumps air into the tires, bunched against a building.
	Peggy approaches him, holding up a joint, smiling
	conspiratorially. She lights it, inhales deeply, then passes
	it to him. He smiles back at her, a bit surprised, but still
	takes the joint and inhales.

	EXT. MOUNTAIN ROAD

	They drive up to a mountain top, Peggy wearing the leather
	jacket. She directs Michael with one arm.

	The motorcycle is parked. Peggy and Michael lie on the grass,
	staring down at the town lights below. Michael inhales the
	joint, then passes it to Peggy.

				MICHAEL
		This is great reefer.

				PEGGY
		Yeah. I'm surprised. It's really
		old... (inhales) Travels well
		though.
			(beat)
		You know, the world looks a lot
		better from up here.

				MICHAEL
		The world is fantastic. It's the
		ultimate absurd circus. I am shot
		from a cannon into the energy.

				PEGGY
		What are you shooting for?

				MICHAEL
		Maximum intensity. Yeah. I can't
		wait to get out of here. I'm gonna
		write. I'm gonna check out of this
		bourgeois motel. Push myself away
		from the dinner table and say 'No
		more Jell—O for me, Mom.'

				PEGGY
		Don't you get along with your
		parents?

				MICHAEL
		The only thing my father digs is
		cold, green money. All my mother
		cares about is her standing at the
		country club.

				PEGGY
		They care about you. They're just a
		different generation.

				MICHAEL
		Hey what's with you? I thought you
		were cool. You rode my bike. You 
		blew some pot.
			(beat)
		What's your scene Miss Majorette?
		You gonna marry Mr. Blue Impala and
		graze around with all the other
		sheep for the rest of your life?

				PEGGY
		I already did that. I want to be a
		dancer, I want to dance.

	Peggy takes off her sweater, kicks off her shoes and begins
	to dance. Her eyes are closed, her body silhouetted by the
	moon. Michael is transfixed. After a few beats, he walks over
	to her. He stretches out his arms and places them around her
	neck. They sway together for several beats, their bodies
	touching. Peggy opens her eyes and sees Michael gazing at her
	tenderly.

				MICHAEL
		You know, I had you pegged all
		wrong.

	Michael kisses Peggy. She responds passionately.

				MICHAEL
		A ray of oneness piercing the
		solitude. Falling bodies in the
		ecstasy of flesh. You'll be a
		chapter in my memoirs of desire.

				PEGGY
		Is that one of your poems?

				MICHAEL
		No, I just made that up. Do
		you want to hear one?

				PEGGY
		I'd love to.

				MICHAEL
			(eyes ablaze)
		Okay. Here's a new one. It's called
		Tenderness.
			(beat)
		I couldn't sleep so I thought I'd
		scream
		Betrayed by a kiss, sucking pods of
		bitterness.
		In the madhouse of Dr. Dread
		Razor shreds of rat puke fall
		On my bare arms
			(sees Peggy grimace; he
		calms down)
		I'm sorry. I guess I was trying to
		impress you.
			(kisses her)

	Peggy is falling for it. He fumbles with her bra straps.

				PEGGY
		Michael... you're as good as you
		looked.

	His other hand reaches to undo her skirt.

				MICHAEL
		I'll respect you for eternity.
			(reciting tenderly)
		'When you are old and gray, and
		full of sleep, And nodding by the
		fire, Take down this book, and
		slowly read, And dream of the soft
		look your eyes had once."
			(beat)
		I didn't write that. That's Yeats.

	Peggy is moved by the beauty of the poem. She sits up, leans
	over Michael, runs her hand through his hair, almost
	motherly.

				PEGGY
		I envy you. You have your whole
		life ahead of you and you know
		exactly what you want to do.
			(beat)
		But forget the rat puke; write
		something beautiful.

	Peggy lies back down on the ground. Michael takes her hand
	and kisses it.

				PEGGY
		You know, this isn't really
		happening.

	CAMERA PULLS BACK to include the entire, perfect tableau: the
	starry night, the motorcycle, the clouds racing across the
	moon and the two lovers on the mountaintop.

	EXT. STREET — DAWN

	Michael stops at the corner of Peggy's street. She gets off
	the bike and kisses Michael goodbye. He takes off.

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE

	Peggy walks up the path as the MILKMAN approaches.

				MILKMAN
		Your parents are waiting up. You
		know, I see a lot of this in the
		spring. Good luck.

				PEGGY
		Thanks, Ralph.

	INT. KELCHER HOUSE

	Peggy enters, trying to be quiet. Mr. Kelcher stands in	the
	kitchen doorway in his bathrobe waiting for her, steaming.

	CAMERA TRACKS Peggy into kitchen. She grabs a cup of	coffee
	before sitting down.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Where have you been?

				PEGGY
		I went for a drive. Up in the
		hills.

				MR. KELCHER
		Damn that Charlie I

				PEGGY
		It's not Charlie. It's me.

				MR. KELCHER
			(nervously)
		Peggy, let me ask you something.
			(beat)
		You're not... expecting are you?

				PEGGY
		At my age? Don't be silly.

				MR. KELCHER
		Thank God for that.

				PEGGY
		Dad.. it's not a big deal. Didn't
		you ever stay out all night when
		you were young?

				MR. KELCHER
		Yes but I was a boy. And I still
		had hell to pay.

				PEGGY
		Calm down. Just listen for a
		minute.. Please.

				MR. KELCHER
		All right. But this better be good.

				PEGGY
		I want to help with the family
		finances. I want you to buy some
		stocks. And gold. By 1980 gold is
		going to be worth eight hundred
		dollars an ounce. Then you sell.

				MR. KELCHER
		Do you know how ridiculous you
		sound? First of all, it's illegal
		for U.S. citizens to buy gold. And
		in the second place, the price of
		gold is regulated by the
		government.

				PEGGY
		I think they're going to deregulate
		it.

				MR. KELCHER
		That's your problems The more women
		think, the more trouble they get
		into.

				PEGGY
		Oh boy, that's another thing that's
		going to change. Who's going to
		think for us? Our husbands? You
		know, you treat Mom like a maid.
		It's not entirely your fault. Those
		were the attitudes in the fifties,
		and that's the way you raised me.
		But give Nancy a break, encourage
		her to go to art school.

				MR. KELCHER
		I've heard just about enough of
		this lunacy! Go to your room!

				PEGGY
		Listen Dad, please. Buy IBM, buy
		Polaroid, buy Apple Computer. No,
		no. Not yet. Buy Xerox!

				MR. KELCHER
		Evelyn, take her to her room!

	Peggy stalks out of the kitchen to the front door.

				MRS. KELCHER
		I'm not the maid!

				PEGGY
		Way to go, Mom!

	The Kelchers glare at each other~. We HEAR the DOOR SLAM.

	INT. SHOWER'S CAFE — DAY

	Peggy and Richard sit in a booth. Richard's kite is hung on a
	coat rack.

				RICHARD
		The way I see it, you have an
		unparalleled opportunity to become
		the richest woman in the world.

				PEGGY
		I'm just not the type. Besides, I
		want to get out of here.

				RICHARD
		But you have a vision. Don't you
		want to help your parents?

				PEGGY
		I tried to tell them, but they
		wouldn't listen to me.

				RICHARD
		I'm talking about invention, no
		investment. I know what people
		think of me. Mr. Spasmatician. Dick
		the Square Root. I'll show them.
		You said I was going to be a
		millionaire. And you're gonna help!

				PEGGY
		Richard, take it easy.

				RICHARD
		No offense, but for a person who
		says she's lived an extra lifetime,
		you certainly are thick. Money is
		power.. Money makes people respect
		you...

				PEGGY
		How come you never ask me any
		important questions? Don't you
		wonder if there's going to be a
		nuclear war? Or a cure for cancer?
		What about your family? What about
		people?

				RICHARD
		I'm curious, but I don't want to
		know. Jeez, I hope you haven't been
		telling people what's going to
		happen to them.

				PEGGY
		Give me some credit, will you?

				RICHARD
		Good. You're discreet. I like that
		in a partner.

				PEGGY
		Wbat're you talking about?

				RICHARD
		Look it's very simple. You tell me
		everything that hasn't been
		invented yet, and I'll invent it.
		We'll be partners. Fifty—fifty.

				PEGGY
		Sixty—forty.

				RI CHARD
		That's not fair.

				PEGGY
		Okay, find yourself another vision.

				RICHARD
		You're taking advantage of a minor.

				PEGGY
		When do we start?

	A WAITRESS approaches their table.

				WAITRESS
		Do you know what you want?

				RICHARD
		A Ton on a Bun, with fries.

				WAITRESS
		And you?

				PEGGY
		Quiche Lorraine, spinach salad and
		a Perrier.

	EXT. DOWNTOWN STREET

	The street is filled with Saturday shoppers. Peggy holds the
	kite, Richard takes notes as they windowshop. They stop in
	front of a dry cleaners.

				PEGGY
		Dry cleaners. No real change. Just
		higher prices.

	They move next door to a shoe store.

				PEGGY
		Ah. This is a biggie. Forget
		sneakers. Running shoes, jogging
		shoes, tennis shoes. Fifty to two
		hundred dollars a pair.

				RICHARD
		Come on. You can't be serious.

				PEGGY
		There are major fortunes to be made
		here. Leisure time and life—styles.

				RICHARD
		Are you talking ~about exercise?
		Like gym?

				PEGGY
		Not for you. Okay, there's lots
		more.

	They move along to the next window, an appliance store. The
	window is filled with old televisions, record players, large
	rotisserie—broilers, etc. The store sign reads: BODELL'S TV
	AND APPLIANCES. Another sign reads: COME IN AND LISTEN TO
	STEREOPHONIC SOUND.

				PEGGY
		Look at that stuff. It's like the
		dark ages. This is more your speed.
		And boy, do I know this business.

	Peggy peers into the store again and catches a g1impse of
	Charlie serving a customer.

	EXT. STREET — BUS STOP

	Peggy and Richard sit on the bench next to TWO OLD. LADIES.
	Richard reads from his list.

				RICHARD
		Let's see...
			(looking around)
		icrowavemays, ocketpay
		alculatorcays...

	The two ladies react.

				PEGGY
		You don't have to use pig Latin!
		Nobody could possibly know what
		we're talking about.

				RICHARD
		All right. These are the choices:
		microwave ovens, pocket
		calculators, Walkmans, digital
		watches and miniature TV's.

				PEGGY
		Oh.	And huge portable radios.
		Everything else gets small, but for
		some reason, portable radios get
		enormous.

	Peggy looks up and sees a lingerie store across the street.
	She heads towards it, calling:

				PEGGY
		I'll be right back.

	Peggy enters the Lingerie store. After a beat, Peggy emerges
	from the store, excited and empty handed. Dodging traffic,
	she hurries back to Richard.

				PEGGY
		Richard! They don't have any! They
		never heard of them! Isn't that
		wonderful?

				RICHARD
		What are you talking about?

				PEGGY
		The wave of the future! I've
		decided on our first fortune! I'll 
		see you later. You just think high
		tech.

				RICHARD
		High tech. I like the sound of
		that.

	EXT. APPLIANCE STORE — DUSK

	At the back is a small record department, complete with a
	listening booth. Charlie is waiting on a customer. Peggy
	enters. CHARLIE'S FATHER is waiting on a buxom YOUNG WOMAN,
	his arm around her shoulder. He turns around as she enters.
	She has a shock of recognition.

				MR. BODELL
			(to young woman)
		Look at that freezer chest. What
		capacity.
			(to Peggy, embarrassed)
		Hello Peggy Sue.

				PEGGY
		Woody! How ya doing?

				MR. BODELL
		Fine, just fine.

	Peggy gives him a big hug and a kiss on the cheek.

				PEGGY
		Nice to see you.

				MR. BODELL
		Charlie's in the back.

	Peggy walks towards the back as Mr. Bodell explains:

				MR. BODELL
		My future daughter—in—law. Very
		affectionate girl.

	INT. RECORD DEPT. — APPLIANCE STORE

	Charlie talks to on ELDERLY GENTLEMAN.

				GENTLEMAN
		I'll just take the Ravel.

				CHARLIE
		Take the Shostakovich home and
		listen to it. Let it grow on you.
		Everyone that's bought it has come
		back and said, "This is definitive
		Shostakovich. Thank you for
		encouraging me to investigate it."

				GENTLEMAN
		Well, I did enjoy the Dvorak you
		suggested. Young man, you talked me
		into it.

	Charlie points Peggy to the listening booth.

				CHARLIE
		You'll like it. I kid you not.

	INT. LISTENING BOOTH

	Peggy sits on the chair. A turntable sits on a small desk.
	Record covers decorate the walls. Charlie enters and sits on
	the desk, his feet resting on Peggy's chair.

				PEGGY
		What do you know about classical
		music?

				CHARLIE
		Nothing.. Selling is selling.

				PEGGY
		Charlie. About last nights..

				CHARLIE
		Forget it. I've been thinking.
		Girls must go through that stuff
		too. Sometimes when I look at you I
		feel like an animal. Maybe my dad's
		right. Teenagers are nuts.

				PEGGY
		But I'm not. I'm a grown woman with
		a lifetime of emotional experiences
		you couldn't possibly understand.

				CHARLIE
		Yeah, I know. Girls mature faster
		than guys. But last night, I was
		the one who put on the brakes. And
		you know why?

				PEGGY
		Why?

	Charlie cups her face in his hands, pouring out his heart.

				CHARLIE
		Because nothing else matters.
		That's the great thing about love.
		Every time we argue, every time
		something goes wrong, and I know
		that I'm not perfect either, things
		just work out better in the end.
		Cause you're my baby and I love
		you.

				PEGGY
		What am I going to do with you?

				CHARLIE
		Don't be cruel to a heart that's
		true.

	INT. KELCHER HAT STORE KELCHER'S HATS - LATE AFTERNOON

	Alone in the store, Mr. Kelcher is going through some
	receipts. Peggy enters carrying a shopping bag.

				PEGGY
		Hi, Dad.

				MR. KELCHER
		Doing some shopping?

	Peggy reaches into the shopping bag and pulls out a small
	wrapped box.

				MR. KELCHER
		For me?

				PEGGY
		Open it.

	He opens the present.  Inside are a pair of miniature golf
	ball cufflinks.

				MR. KELCHER
		Sweetheart, they're beautiful. But
		they must've been expensive.

	Across the street an ice cream truck pulls up. Mothers,
	fathers and children crowd around the back as the driver exit
	the cab.

				PEGGY
		I closed my Christmas club.

				MR. KELCHER
		Good, you got your money out of
		that greedy bank.

				PEGGY
		I wanted to apologize for this
		morning.

				MR. KELCHER
		It's hard to believe you're going
		to be eighteen.
			(looks out the window)
		Want an eskimo pie? Or a
		creamsicle?
		I'd come home from the store and
		there's little you running up to
		me. I'd give you a dime and you'd
		promise never to grow up.

				PEGGY
		Quiet today?

				MR. KELCHER
		This morning was good.

				PEGGY
		The hat business is in trouble.

				MR. KELCHER
		I, that what all that nonsense was
		about this morning? You're worried
		about my business?

				PEGGY
		Yes.

				MR. KELCHER
		That's very thoughtful, honey. It's
		just a slump. Things will pick up.

				PEGGY
		But when John F. Kennedy's elected
		President, men'1l stop wearing
		hats.

				MR. KELCHER
		Kennedy's a Catholic. He'll never
		win.

				PEGGY
			(gravely; closing her
		eyes)
		He'll win.

				MR. KELCHER
		Richard Nixon's going to be
		President. Nixon wears hats.

	INT. NANCY'S ROOM	

	Peggy is helping her sister Nancy with an art project.

				NANCY
		You think this'll cheer Dad up?

				PEGGY
		Of course, he'll love it. You're a
		terrific artist.

	We HEAR Mr. Kelcher arguing loudly from downstairs. The two
	girls freeze.

				MR. KELCHER (O.S.)
		I don't need your charity. I don't
		need your grandmother's jewelry or
		your parents money -—how could you
		do that?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Please don't shout.

	Peggy opens the door, Nancy cautiously behind.

				MR. KELCHER (O.S.)
		I'm not shouting. Have we ever
		starved? Have we ever missed a
		mea1?

	INT. DOWNSTAIRS — PEGGY'S POV:

	Mrs. Kelcher moves around the room, closing the windows.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Does everybody have to hear?

				MR. KELCHER
		I want everybody to hear because I
		don't have anything to be ashamed
		of.

	Mr. Kelcher collapses into his barcalounger, red as a beet.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Jack, I was just trying to help.

				MR. KELCHER
		We'll make it, we'll be fine.

	INT. NANCY'S ROOM

	Nancy is frightened.

				NANCY
		Does this mean we're going to be
		poor?

	Peggy leads her back into her room without letting her
	parents know they were there.

	INT. PEGGY'S ROOM

	We HEAR the song "Stranger in Paradise" from Kismet on the
	old black and white record player from opening scene. Peggy
	sits on the floor, surrounded by stockings, leotards and a
	sewing basket. She cuts the legs oft a pair of leotards. In
	one hand she holds up the top half of the leotards, in the
	other hand, a pair of nylon stockings.

	We HEAR a KNOCK on the bedroom door. Peggy pushes everything
	under the bed as Maddy and Carol enter.

				CAROL
		All right. What's the scoop?

				PEGGY
		On what?

				MADDY
		How come we're your best friends
		and we had to find out about you
		and Michael Fitzsimmons from
		Dolores?

				PEGGY
		She's unbelievable. Who needs
		satellites when we've got Dolores's
		mouth?

				CAROL
		I hear she does more than talk with
		her mouth.

				MADDY
		That's disgusting!

				CAROL
			(brushing her hair) )
		Oh, Maddy, grow up. It says in LOVE
		WITHOUT FEAR that "the tongue kiss
		as a means of genital stimulation
		is widely practiced and has much to
		commend it". Page eighty—six.

				PEGGY
		Did you memorize the whole book or
		only the good parts?

				CAROL
		Just what you underlined.

				PEGGY
		You're kidding...? Carol, you have
		beautiful hair.

				CAROL
		Come on. What's with you and
		Michael?

				MADDY
		Yeah. He's so cool and mysterious.

				PEGGY
		He's very interesting. For all his
		pretending to be a tough guy, he's
		really got the soul of a poet.

				CAROL
		I bet Dolores told Charlie.

				PEGGY
		That loud—mouthed little bitch~

				MADDY
		Peggy Sue!

				CAROL
		You better watch out for her. She's
		after Charlie.

				PEGGY
		Cool it kids. He's free to see
		other girls, if he wants.

				MADDY
		But I always thought that you would
		marry Charlie, Carol would marry
		Walter, and I would marry Arthur.
		We'd all live on the same street
		and take our kids to the park
		together and have barbecues every
		Sunday. It'll spoil everything if
		you and Charlie break up. That
		Michael doesn't look like the
		barbecue type.

				PEGGY
		I'm not going to marry him. I just
		went out with him once.
			(beat)
		I know! Why don't we go to the
		movies tonight. Just us girls.
		It'll be fun.

				CAROL
		Don't be silly. It's Saturday. Date
		night!

				MADDY
		Yeah. I've gotta go. Arthur's
		picking me up soon.

				PEGGY
		Okay. But let's have a girls night
		soon. Maybe a pajama party.

				CAROL
		Aren't we a little old for that?

				MADDY
		Sometimes you're so immature.

	INT. KELCHER LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

	Peggy turns to face her parents, holding up her home—made
	pantyhose with a flourish.

				PEGGY
		Ta da! Pantyhose! The death of the
		garter belt! Of course, once
		they're manufactured they'll look
		better than this. What do you
		think?

				MR. KELCHER
		This is your great invention?
			(to Mrs. Kelcher)
		Would you wear those things?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Would they go over my girdle or
		under?

				PEGGY
		Instead of a girdle. And light as a
		feather.

				MRS. KELCHER.
		Jack, I think she's got something
		there.

				PEGGY
		And we won't just sell them in
		department stores. We'll market
		them in drug stores and 
		supermarkets.

				MR. KELCHER
		That's all well and good, but we
		don't have the money to manufacture
		them.	

				PEGGY
		You need a partner. There's a
		friend of mine at school whose
		father makes seat covers for cars,
		Mr. Fitzsimmons. I've invited him
		and his family over for dinner
		tomorrow night.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Isn't that awfully forward?

				PEGGY
		We've got to move fast. This is an
		idea whose time has come.

				MR. KELCHER 
		You mean to tell me that you
		invited this Mr. Fitzsimmons over
		to talk about investing his money
		in your cockamamie idea?

				PEGGY
		Wrong, Dad. Your idea.

	INT. PEGGY'S BEDROOM — NIGHT

	A breeze blows through the open window Peggy sleeps fitfully,
	tossing off the covers. We HEAR NOISES from outside her
	window. A figure appears outside and silently climbs into the
	bedroom. Peggy mumbles Charlie's name. The man walks over to
	her bed as Peggy reaches out for him, tenderly, as if they
	were still married.

				PEGGY
		Charlie. I just had the strangest
		dream.

				CHARLIE
			(whispering)
		I have to talk to you..

	Through her sleep—clouded eyes, Peggy begins to focus on the
	face of the younger Charlie. Suddenly, she remembers.

				PEGGY
		What are you doing here?

				CHARLIE
			(angry)
		Let's go down to the basement.

	INT. BASEMENT

	Peggy enters, flicks on the light and leads Charlie in. Peggy
	senses Charlie's anger, and steels herself for the inevitable
	confrontation.

				CHARLIE
		I want to know what's going on.
		Dolores told me that you and that
		scuzzball Michael Fitzsimmons...

				PEGGY
		I bumped into him after you dropped
		me off Last night. I didn't feel
		like going home, so we went for a
		ride.

				CHARLIE
			(furious)
		Then it's true, dammit! I had a
		miserable time tonight 'cause of
		you. When the Monotones did "Book
		of Love —— Chapter Four you break
		up, won't you give it just one more
		chance..." I'm thinking Did we
		break up? 'Cause if we did, I don't
		even know about it!. I thought we
		cleared all that up yesterday. Did
		that Maynard G. Beatnik give you
		what you wanted?

				PEGGY
		You know I never could stand your
		sarcasm.

				CHARLIE
		You're going to blow it, Peggy Sue.
		Nobody treats Charlie Bodell like
		this.

				PEGGY
		And why do you always refer to
		yourself in the third person, like
		Napoleon? How come it always turns
		into an argument with you?

				CHARLIE
		Look, I've got the hair, got the
		eyes, got the teeth, I got the car.
		I'm the lead singer, I'm the man.

				PEGGY
		Charlie,. I've been trying to
		postpone this. But what's the
		point? It's over.
			(crying)
		I don't want to hurt you. This is
		very hard for me. I'm doing this
		for both of us. I really want you
		to be happy.

				CHARLIE
		I will be happy if I have you. I
		love you.

				PEGGY
		That won't make any difference.
		We just can't live together. And
		you had the nerve to drive up with
		that bimbo Janet.

				CHARLIE
		What are you talking about? Who's
		Janet?

				PEGGY
		I just can't trust you anymore.

				CHARLIE
		What about everything I said to you
		this afternoon...

				PEGGY
		That's just it. You can always get
		to me. There's this window in my
		heart and every time I leave it
		open, you climb in. Unless I close
		it now, nothing's ever going to be
		different!

				CHARLIE
		But what has to be different?

				PEGGY
		Everything. I have a good head for
		business, I should be franchising
		the bakery. And I want you to give
		me your word that whatever happens,
		you'll go to college. And finish.

				CHARLIE
		What! What about the group and my
		singing career? What about me?

				PEGGY
		I'm trying to save you years of
		frustration... waiting for a big
		break... no. Waiting for that big
		disappointment so you could blame
		it all on me.

				CHARLIE
		You don't know zip! You think I'm
		going to end up selling appliances
		like my father? Chasing women
		around the store. I've got to give
		it a shot. Why are you trying to
		kill the two things that mean the
		most to me? Until yesterday you
		loved me and you loved us.
			(opening the door) )
		What the hell has changed? For two
		years I've done nothing but love
		you. I'll show you, I'm going to be
		just like Fabian!

	Charlie exits. Peggy slumps back, drained. Getting up, she
	crosses to the mounted swordfish. Standing on a chair she
	reaches into the mouth of the fish and pulls out a package of
	Pall Malls. She puts a cigarette in her mouth and picks up a
	table lighter and flicks it. As it lights, the tiny music box
	inside PLAYS SMOKE GETS IN YOUR EYES.

	INT. KELCHER KITCHEN - MORNING

	We HEAR distant CHURCH BELLS. Peggy sits down to scan the
	large Sunday newspaper. Seeing her mother's phone book, she
	finds the number she needs and picks up the phone. She dials
	slowly.

				PEGGY
			(very nervous)
		Hello, Grandma. It's Peggy Sue.
		Much better. How are you? I'm very
		sorry about the other day.

	EXT. STREET — APPROACHING RICHARD'S HOUSE

	Peggy jogs towards Richard. He is watering the front lawn.

				PEGGY
			(breathless)
		Hi, Richard.

				RICHARD
		What are you doing?

				PEGGY
		Jogging. I was running, now I'm
		jogging.

				RICHARD
		That's what you were talking about
		yesterday? Everybody does that in
		the future?

				PEGGY
		Yep. It's going to be a law.
			(beat)
		I broke up with Charlie last night.

				RICHARD
		That's terrific. You did it. You
		really changed the course of your
		destiny.

				PEGGY
		It was an unfair fight. He didn't
		have a chance. I'm taking a real
		gamble. I loved him for a long,
		long time.

				RICHARD
		Cheer up. Now you can give some
		other guy a shot. Make it up to him
		later and buy him a yacht.

				PEGGY
		For God's sake, forget the money!
		I'm going crazy! I'm a walking
		anachronism. I'm a puddle of deja
		I'm worried about my kids, Scott
		must be scared to death, I think my
		daughter's doing drugs again. I
		can't have any fun here, I don't
		have that innocence any more. I
		can't keep all this in anymore. I
		feel Like I'm going to explode.

				RICHARD
		Look, the best scientific mind in
		this country is working on your
		case. May I make a suggestion?

				PEGGY
		Like what?

				RICHARD
			(excited)
		Suggestion! Hypnotic suggestion!
		Why didn't I think o~ that before?

				PEGGY
		What do you know about hypnosis?

				RICHARD
		Everything. This is perfect. The
		subconscious mind remembers all.
		You can give me more information on
		microchips and then pinpoint what
		happened at the reunion. Maybe
		that'll give us a clue on how to
		get you back.

				PEGGY
		Look, I'm desperate. I'll try
		anything. But what if you can't
		snap me out of it?

				RICHARD
		No offense, but you're pretty out
		of it now.

	INT. RICHARD'S GARAGE

	Peggy sits in an old recliner. Richard holds a small,
	battery—operated revolving disc up in front of Peggy's closed
	eyes, then puts it down and picks up a notepad and pen.

				RICHARD
		You are completely relaxed. When I
		count to three, you will open your
		eyes. One... two... three.
			(Peggy's eyes flutter
		open)
		We'll start with something easy.
		What is your name?

				PEGGY
			(trance—like)
		Peggy Sue Kelcher.
			(beat)
		Or, Peggy Bodell.
			(beat)
		I'm not sure.

				RICHARD
		Oh boy. Peggy, what are microchips?

				PEGGY
		Ah..... they're very tiny... they
		look like a fingernail made out of
		an erector set...

				RICHARD
		What will they be made of?

				PEGGY
		I think it's called silicon.
		Charlie told me that.

				RICHARD
		Silicon is from sand.

				PEGGY
		We were lying in the sand. It was
		my eighteenth birthday... We were
		so awkward... I would have married
		him anyway...

	Peggy starts to shift in the chair. Her shorts hike up, her
	legs spread slightly. This is not lost on Richard. Weird,
	guttural sounds begin to emanate from his throat.

				RICHARD
		In the future, will you have to
		marry a girl before you have sex
		with her?

				PEGGY
		No. The Pill will change all that.
		Then he wouldn't have blamed me. We
		were just too young.

				RICHARD
		You mean you'll give a girl a pill
		and she'll want to have sex?

				PEGGY
		No. The Pill will be for birth
		control. But girls do like sex.
		Maybe not the first time.

				RICHARD
		Will you take of f your blouse?

				PEGGY
		Yes, every day.
			(taking her blouse off —
		getting spaced) 
		Maybe I shouldn't have worn that
		dress? I told Beth it was a bad idea.
		That's why they made me Queen.

	Peggy's meandering makes Richard nervous.

				MAN'S VOICE (O.S.)
		Richard, are you in there?

	Richard frantically tries to put Peggy's blouse back on.
	She's limp and unresponsive.

				RICHARD
			(shouting)
		No! Yes! I'll be right out, Dad.
			(urgent)
		Oh shit! Peggy, I'm going to snap
		you out of it.

				PEGGY
		I couldn't help it —— I loved him.

				RICHARD
		One... two... three.
			(claps twice)
		You are now awake.

	Richard kneels on top of Peggy as she wakes up, fumbling the
	buttons at her breasts. Peggy comes to, as Richard jumps off.
	She buttons her blouse, furious.

				PEGGY
		Richard! You should be ashamed of
		yourself.

				RICHARD
		Me? You went crazy! You started
		taking your clothes off. I was
		putting them back on for you.

				PEGGY
		That's just perfect isn't it? Did
		it work? Did you find out why I
		came back?

				RICHARD
		I think it has something to do with
		your birthday. You were rambling. I
		didn't understand the rest.

				PEGGY
		God dammit! How'm I gonna got out
		of here?

	Peggy grabs a glass beaker and hurls it against the wall.

				RICHARD
		Hey! Do you have any idea how much
		those beakers cost? I usually
		charge for hypnosis.

				PEGGY
		Oh, go feel up your hamsters! I
		hear rodents put out.

	Peggy storms out.

	INT. KELCHER HOUSE

	Mrs. Kelcher stands at the counter preparing a pot roast.
	Peggy's making a chocolate mousse.

				MRS. KELCHER
		You know, dear, I think the
		pantyhose is a wonderful idea, but
		the next time you come up with
		something, please don't stay out
		all night. Just tell us. We'll
		believe you.

				PEGGY
		Mom, how about a machine that's
		like your blender, only it slices
		vegetables, kneads dough, chops
		meat and even make fresh pasta?

				MRS KELCHER
		What's pasta?

	INT. KELCHER DINING ROOM

	Peggy and Mrs. Kelcher are setting the table, taking the good
	china out of the cabinet. A dozen red roses grace the table.

				MRS. KELCHER
		These roses are beautiful. And so
		romantic'. Who is this Michael? Is
		he a friend of Charlie's?

	She moves the Jell-O mold.

				PEGGY
		No, just a friend of mine. I don't
		think he Likes Jell—O.

				MRS. KELCHER
		What does Charlie think about that?

				PEGGY
		You know Mom, it's okay to have
		male friends. Besides, it's over
		with me and Charlie.

				MRS. KELCHER
			(shocked)
		What? When did it happen? Your dad
		and I always expected you two to
		get married.

				PEGGY
		Yeah, I know Peggy Sue gets
		married. Case closed. Period. Mom,
		if you could live your life over
		again, would you do the same thing?
		Get married and settle down after
		high school?

				MRS  KELCHER
		Of course I loved your Lather.
		I remember once being offered a
		scholarship to art school. But I
		turned it down.

				PEGGY
		Why?

				MRS. KELCHER
		All the college girls I knew were
		so well, dressed. I was worried
		that I wouldn't fit in. I didn't
		have the right clothes. I was so
		silly. But, I don't have many
		regrets, and besides, r don't have
		time to worry about the past. But
		Charlie. I hope you know what
		you're doing.

	INT. DINING ROOM — TWO HOURS LATER

	Michael, DORIS and ED FITZSIMMONS sit at the table with the
	Kelchers. They have just finished dessert.

				MR. FITZSIMMONS
		Moose?  I never thought I'd have
		moose for desert.

	The adults laugh. Michael looks bored.

				MR. KELCHER
		Peggy Sue cooked the whole dinner.

				NANCY
		But Mom helped.

				MR. FITZSIMMONS
		You know, you should open a
		restaurant.

				PEGGY
		It's incredibly difficult to make
		money in the restaurant business.
		You have to get up at five in the
		morning to go to the market, you
		have problems with spoilage,
		employee pilferage, and just try
		and collect from the credit card
		companies. They take months to pay.

	The whole table is astonished.

				MR. FITZSIMMONS
		How does a young gal like you know
		so much about business?

				PEGGY
		Oh, I just picked it up from my
		dad. He's a wonderful businessman.

				MR. FITZSIMMONS
		Really?

	Peggy gives her father a go get him look. Michael's writing
	in a pocket notebook.

				MR. KELCHER
		Ah, Ed, why don't you and I adjourn
		to the den for a while?

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE

	Peggy~ and Michael stand by Michael's motorcycle, passing a
	cigarette.

				MICHAEL
		That was quite an evening.
		Bourgeois, phony, decadent, stupid.

				PEGGY
		I shouldn't have put you through
		that. It must have been agony.
		Let's do something.

	Michael makes a move towards Peggy, with lust in his eyes.

				PEGGY
		No. Something else. I'm too full.
		Besides, it's a school night.

	EXT. GHETTO STREET - NIGHT

	Michael and Peggy pull up on the motorcycle in front of
	Lena's Lounge, a seedy bar in the town's black ghetto. Half a
	dozen blacks are banging around outside. They eye Peggy and
	Michael suspiciously.

	INT. LENA'S LOUNGE

	The room has a bar at one side, booths and tables in the rest
	of the room. A stage is at the far end. On stage, an all
	black group, The Four—Mations, is performing the song GOOD
	TIMIN' The people in the club are dancing the Twist.

	Peggy and Michael sit in the last booth. Several people wave
	hello to Michael.. Although Peggy and Michael can see the
	stage, their booth is not visible from the stage.

				MICHAEL
		Five more weeks of school. And ten
		minutes past graduation I'm gone.
			(he raises his glass)
		To freedom.

				PEGGY
			(looking around at the
		crowd — clinking glasses)
		For everyone.

				MICHAEL
		Now listen, this is the plan. As
		soon as school is finished we go to
		Utah and...

				PEGGY
		Utah? I thought you'd be going to
		New York or Paris. What's in Utah?

				MICHAEL
		Rita. I met her last summer. She's
		cool. You'll really dig her. She's
		got this great little cabin in the
		hills, just outside of Provo where
		she raises chickens. I'll write and
		the two of you can take care of the
		chickens to support us.

				PEGGY
			(astounded)
		I can't do that.

				MICHAEL
		Why not? Polygamy's legal in Utah.

				PEGGY
		I hate chickens.

	ANGLE — THE STAGE

	On stage, the Four—Nations have concluded their song.

	We HEAR APPLAUSE.

				SINGER
		Thank you. Now we're happy to
		introduce, a friend of ours. He's
		one damn fine singer, Mr. Charlie
		Dell!

	We HEAR the GROVE BEGIN the SONG SEA OF LOVE. 

				MICHAEL
		But what about the other night? We
		were like two stars in the same
		constellation.

				PEGGY
		Michael, you and I are light years
		apart. You should go, but not with
		me.

				MICHAEL
		But we had heat baby. Passion!
		Fire! We owe it to ourselves to
		fuse together.
			(beat)
		At least one more time.

				PEGGY
		That's a terrific line. You're
		going to be a wonderful writer.

				MICHAEL
		You think so?

				PEGGY
		Yes. We had a glorious night
		together. One day you'll remember
		and write about it.

				MICHAEL
		I can dig that. Bittersweet
		perfection. Dogs of lust on leashes
		of memory... yeah.

	Suddenly distracted by the familiar voice, Peggy looks up to
	the stage and sees that the lead singer, Charlie Bell, is in
	fact, Charlie Bodell.

	PEGGY'S POV:	THE STAGE — CHARLIE SINGING

				PEGGY (0.S.)
		It's Charlie!

				MICHAEL (0.S.)
		What a treat.

	INTERCUT - CHARLIE SINGING — WITH REACTIONS OF PEGGY AND
	MICHAEL. Michael observes Peggy's intimate reaction to
	Charlie's singing.

				MICHAEL
		Now I get it.

				PEGGY
		Ssh. He's great.

				MICHAEL
		Peggy Sue's still stuck on treble
		without a cause.

	Charlie finishes the song as the audience goes wild. He
	beams.

				PEGGY
		I thought I knew everything about
		him.

				MICHAEL
		Can we split now?

	Peggy and Michael unobtrusively slip out of the club. Charlie
	leaves the stage. He's met by a greasy looking MAN. They sit
	down at a booth to talk.

	EXT. KELCHER HOUSE — NIGHT

	Michael and Peggy pull up. Peggy gets off the bike and gives
	Michael a good—night kiss.

				MICHAEL
		I can dig you being uptight about
		Rita and Utah. That's cool.
		But I've got to warn you about
		something.

				PEGGY
		What?

				MICHAEL
		My father. He's not just the
		ultimate square. He's a total
		crook.

	INT. KELCHER KITCHEN

	Mrs. Kelcher finishes the dishes, with rubber gloves on. Mr.
	Kelcher sits, cleaning his pipe. Peggy enters.

				PEGGY
		How did it go with the pantyhose?

				MR. KELCHER
		It's the darndest thing. Ed knew
		what they were immediately. As a
		matter of fact, he said he's got a
		product like that in development
		right now.

				PEGGY
		Oh no!

				MR. KELCHER
		Didn't call, them pantyhose,
		though. What was it, Evelyn?

				MRS. KELCHER
		Sheerotards. Catchy name, isn't it? 
		Like leotards.

				PEGGY
		He's a liar! He has no such thing!
		It's my own fault. I should have
		had it patented first. He's a
		crook, damnit.

				MR. KELCHER
		Peggy Sue, watch your mouth.

				MRS. KELCHER
		Mr. Fitzsimmons is a very prominent
		man.

				PEGGY
		Oh, you're both so naive.

				MR. KELCHER
		Look young lady, I grew up through
		the depression. I fought in the
		second World War. Six days a week I
		get up and deal with the public,
		the bank and the bill collectors.
		And on the seventh day, when God
		rests, I don't have to listen to my
		daughter calling me a fool!

				MRS. KELCHER
		You have a point, dear.

	INT. PEGGY'S ROOM 

	(POSS. OMIT THIS SCENE)

	Peggy lies in bed in the darkness, her eyes wide open. The
	bedside clock reads: 2:47. Peggy gets out of bed.

	CAMERA TRACKS Peggy into Nancy's room. Peggy looks down at
	Nancy sleeping. Gently pulling back the blankets, Peggy gets
	into bed with her.

	EXT. CHARLIE'S STREET — MORNING

	Peggy walks down a residential street, much like her
	parents'. She stops when she sees Charlie's car parked in a
	driveway, and leans against a tree next to his car. Moments
	later, Charlie exits his house, a dog trailing behind him.
	The dog runs up to Peggy. Charlie is wary and distant.

				CHARLIE
		What're you doing here?

				PEGGY
		I wanted to talk to you, and I have
		one last thing to take care of at
		school. Then I'm going to...
			(pats dog)
		Good dog, Rusty. Good dog.

				CHARLIE
		Rusty's dead. That's Ajax

	Charlie throws a stick. Ajax chases it, never comes back.

				PEGGY
		Oh. I guess I always liked Rusty
		better.
			(beat)
		Could you give me a ride to school?

				CHARLIE
		Sorry, the Blue Thunder's out of
		commission for a while.

				PEGGY
		Well, how about a walk, Charlie
		Bell..

				CHARLIE
		How'd you know about that?

				PEGGY
		I was at Lena's last night. You
		were terrific.

				CHARLIE
		Not terrific enough. What were you
		doing in that part of town? Who
		were you with?

				PEGGY
		What were You doing there? You
		never told me you were singing with
		an R and B group.

				CHARLIE
		Hey. I guess there's a lot of
		things we don't know about each
		other.

	Charlie and Peggy walking.

				PEGGY
		I'd forgotten how much music meant
		to you.

				CHARLIE
		That's real big of you.

				PEGGY
		Stop being defensive. I want to
		help you. I wrote a song for you.

				CHARLIE
		You're kidding. You wrote a song?
		Is it about a guilty girl and a
		trusting guy... she wants to hurt
		him, and he wonders why?

	Peggy takes a piece of paper from her purse.

				PEGGY
		Not exactly, but with your great
		voice, it'll be a huge hit. Honest.

				CHARLIE
		Fat chance. You know, Lee Wilkins
		came to hear me last night. He told
		me to forget it. You told me to
		forget it. My parents tell me to
		forget it.

				PEGGY
		Just take a look at it.
			(hands him the lyric)

				CHARLIE
		If you took the trouble to write
		it, then sure, I'll take a look at
		it. But I'm beginning to think that
		maybe there's more to life than
		music. I wonder if people would
		still like me if I stopped being
		Mr. Excitement?

	INT. SCHOOL HALLWAY

	Peggy and Charlie stand by their open locker.

				CHARLIE
		Does this mean you like me again?

				PEGGY
		It means I care about you and what
		happens to you.

				CHARLIE
		That's all I wanted to hear. 'Cause
		I'm never going to give up on us.
		It's easy to fall apart in a
		crisis. It's easy to be selfish and
		say goodbye and good luck. But this
		is more than love. This is a mental
		decision. Just wait till tomorrow,
		when you see your birthday present.
		Then you'll understand.

	Charlie walks away as Peggy reaches into the locker for her
	books.

				CAROL
		Peggy, I have to talk to you.

	Peggy turns to Carol. They walk down the hallway together.

				PEGGY
		What's the matter?

				CAROL
		It's that jerk Walter.

				PEGGY
		What happened?

				CAROL
		After Charlie told Walter that he
		broke up with you because he wanted
		to play the field, Walter decided
		he should do the same thing.

				PEGGY
		Welcome to the singles' scene.

				CAROL
		What a I going to do for the rest
		of my life? I don't have a
		boyfriend anymore.

				PEGGY
		Look, Carol, maybe Walter's done
		you a big favor. You always said
		you wanted to get out of town. Go
		for it. And be happy, goddamnit,
		I'm rooting for you.

	ANOTHER ANGLE

	Walter walks up to Charlie.

				WALTER
		Hey Charlie, what do you think of
		this?

	Walter does a totally demented dance step, finishing by
	strumming his leg like a guitar. He stands there grinning.

				CHARLIE
		Walter, maybe you should be a
		dentist.

	INT. CLASSROOM

	Peggy sits at her desk, organizing her books. We hear the end
	of the ANNOUNCEMENTS over the P.A. SYSTEM.

				MR. MOSEY (V.0.)
		And finally, our heartiest
		congratulations to our girls diving
		team for placing second in the
		county finals last Friday. And a
		special accolade to Rosalie Testa
		who placed first in every one of
		her events. We're proud of you,
		Rosalie.

	Everybody turns toward Rosalie and applauds. Peggy turns to
	Rosalie, trembling. The BELL RINGS as the class starts to
	leave, still crowded around Rosalie. Peggy stares after her,
	frozen in her seat Dolores approaches.

				DOLORES
		What's the matter, princess? Lost
		your prince?

	Peggy looks up at Dolores and starts to seethe. She stands up
	slowly and faces Dolores.

				PEGGY
		You know Dolores, there's a lot of
		things I could say to you, but
		you're not worth the effort.

	Peggy reaches down to	up her books. On the top of the pile is
	an open fountain pen, which she picks up, pul1ing the release
	lever, squirting ink all over Dolores's dress. Dolores drops
	her books, looks down at her dress, horrified.

				PEGGY
		Sorry. These fountain pens are so
		tricky.

				DOLORES
			(screams)
		Oh! You did that on purpose! I hate
		you. Go gargle with razor blades!

				PEGGY
		I beg your pardon?

				DOLORES
		Take a long walk on a short pier.

				PEGGY
		Have a nice day.

	INT. GIRLS' LOCKER ROOM

	Peggy sits disconsolate on a bench, watching the other girls
	changing into their swim suits. Rosalie is in the shower
	room, wetting down her suit. She accepts congratulations from
	a number of the girls. The BELL RINGS as the girls begin to
	exit to the pool.

				PEGGY
		Rosalie! Wait!

	Rosalie turns at the door, smiling. They are alone.

				ROSALIE
		What's up?

				PEGGY
		I think you should give up diving.
		It's dangerous.

				ROSALIE
		Don't be silly, I'm the best in
		the county.

				PEGGY
		I know you are, but you have to
		stop. I couldn't tell you before,
		I didn't know if I should. But you
		have to stop before you hurt
		yourself.

				ROSALIE
		I spend three hours a day
		practicing. I have trainers, I know
		what I'm doing.

				PEGGY
		But accidents can happen.

				ROSALIE
		Not to me they don't. I'm going to
		win the State, then the. Nationals,
		and then I'm going to the Olympics.

				PEGGY
		Rosalie, please, listen to me! You
		have to stop.

				ROSALIE
		You're sick. You should go to the
		nurse. I'm going to tell Miss
		Dennis.

	Rosalie exits into the pool area. Peggy feels helpless.

	INT. HALLWAY

	Peggy walks down the hall, a set of double doors, leading to
	the pool, just ahead of her through them she sees Rosalie
	diving through the air with the careless innocence of youth.

	Burdened with the inevitability of it all, she rushes through
	the hall, and is stopped by Richard.

				RICHARD
		What's the matter?

				PEGGY
		It's all, gone wrong, nothing's
		working out.

				RICHARD
		Not true.  I think I'm making real
		progress on the microchip.

				PEGGY
		You were meant to. You're one of
		those fortunate people that good
		things happen to. I have to get out
		of here.

	She starts to walk away.

				RICHARD
		Peggy, I believe you. I believe
		everything you told me. It's
		wonderful. You're the exception
		that proves the rule.

	She kisses him on the forehead.

				PEGGY
		I love you too, Richard. Thanks for
		trying.

	She continues down the hallway.

	EXT. AUDITORIUM - DAY

	Peggy heads out the door, sees Charlie.

				CHARLIE
		Hey, Peggy. Wait a minute.

	Peggy stops on the landing. Charlie joins her, so eager. He
	doesn't notice how distraught she is.

				CHARLIE
		I cut shop and did some work on
		your song. You know, it's not half
		bad for your first try. Of course,
		I changed all the "yeahs" to
		"oohs". Listen to this.

	Charlie begins to sing an R&B version of SHE LOVES YOU.

				PEGGY
		Forget it, it'll never work.

				CHARLIE
		Okay. Listen, I cancelled the
		tickets for Fabian. I thought it
		would be better for your birthday
		to eat at a nice restaurant, Chez
		Tres.

	Walter, Arthur, Maddy and Carol watch as Peggy runs away.

	INT./EXT. BUS OR TRAIN - HIGHWAY

	INTERCUT the bus, Peggy looking out the window, the rural
	scenery: pastures, barns, etc., the other passengers.

	EXT. STATION

	Peggy's grandparents, ELIZABETH and BARNEY ALVORG , wait in 
	the front of the station.

	INT. BUS

	Peggy sees her grandparents waiting for her.  She grips the
	window rail tightly, trying to hold herself together.

				BUS DRIVER
		Everybody gettin' off at Dumont.
		Here we are.

	Peggy stands and reaches above to take down her suitcase.
	Nervous, she drops it. A MAN, getting off the bus, helps her,
	picking it up.

				PEGGY
		Thank you.

				MAN
		No trouble at all. 

	The man gets off the bus.

	EXT. GENERAL STORE

	Peggy stands at the door of the bus, hesitant. Elizabeth and
	Barney approach the bus, waving and smiling up at her.

				BARNEY
		Hello, Lilla!

				ELIZABETH
		Peggy Sue!

	Peggy slowly walks down the steps, moved to tears. She
	approaches her grandparents and drops her suitcases. She hugs
	them tightly. The bus door closes and the bus pulls away
	behind them.

	INT. CAR — DRIVING

	Barney is behind the wheel of a 1951 Plymouth. Elizabeth is
	in front, Peggy curled up in the back, regressing.

				BARNEY
		Quite a bit more rain than usual
		this year. I hope it doesn't spoil
		the rhubarb.

				ELIZABETH
		I've already got some in. I was
		thinking of making a pie for dinner
		tonight.
			(turning around to Peggy)
		How would you like that?

				PEGGY
			(like a little girl)
		Fine. 
			(beat) )
		Grandma, would you teach me how to
		make strudel?

				ELIZABETH
		That's a day's work. But if that's
		what you want, maybe we can do it
		tomorrow for your birthday.

	INT. FARMHOUSE/KITCHEN - NIGHT

	Peggy and Elizabeth finish up the dishes, chatting.

	INT. LIVING ROOM

	A fire blazes in the fireplace. A grandfather clock stands
	prominently in the room. The clock from Peggy's house.
	Peggy sits with Elizabeth, learning how to knit. Barney
	laughs at "The Burns and Allen Show" on TV.

	Suddenly, Peggy places her hand over her heart and shivers
	with fear.

				BARNEY
		What's the matter, Lilla? Somebody
		jump on your grave?

	Peggy shivers again and shakes her head.

	INT. LIVING ROOM - LATER

	Barney reading. Elizabeth enters, carrying a tray with cups
	of cocoa. They each take a cup.

				ELIZABETH
		You know, Peggy Sue, your mother
		said you had a dream that I died.

				PEGGY
		I wish she hadn't.

				ELIZABETH
		I'm not afraid. I know exactly when
		I'm going to die.

	Peggy is perplexed by her grandmother's apparent lack of
	fear.

				BARNEY
		What's it going to be, Elizabeth?
		Seventy—five? Eighty?

				ELIZABETH
		I'm not telling.

				BARNEY
		I've been trying to drag it out of
		her for years.
			(beat)
		You know, dreams are fascinating
		business. 'Specially where you see
		the future.

				PEGGY
		Do you believe in all of that?

				BARNEY
		Well, I like to speculate. This
		book I'm reading right now, a woman
		in Colorado says she lived in
		Ireland a hundred and fifty years
		ago. Her name was Bridey Murphy-
		and she gives names and dates and
		where she lived. She was
		hypnotized. Big bestseller.

				PEGGY
		I remember that book!
			(beat)
		Grandpa, Grandma, I want to tell
		you something.

	EXT. FARMHOUSE KITCHEN — DAY

	Peggy and Elizabeth are making strudel.

				ELIZABETH
		If you believe it, darling, then I
		believe. Being young can be just
		as confusing as being old. The
		things that happened to me fifty
		years ago are more on my mind than
		what happened yesterday.

				PEGGY
		But I'm remembering the future.

				ELIZABETH
		Right now you're just browsing
		through time. Choose the things
		you'll be proud of. The things that
		Last.

				PEGGY
		My children make me happy. I miss
		them so much.
			(beat)
		Beth. Scott and Beth.
			(beat)
		I'm going to name my daughter after
		you.

	EXT. FARMHOUSE DRIVEWAY — DUSK

	Peggy and Barney are washing the car at a standpipe, two
	hundred feet from the house.

				BARNEY
		It's gonna rain again. Every
		time I wash the car, it rains.

				PEGGY
		That never changes.
			(beat)
		You know, when you and Grandma are
		gone, the family's gone. I never
		see the cousins anymore.

				BARNEY
		It's your grandma's strudel that's
		kept this family together.

				PEGGY
		Grandpa, if you had a chance to do
		it all again, what would you do?

				BARNEY
			(jawing)
		I'd take better care of my teeth.

	INT. LIVING ROOM

	Elizabeth is tying Barney's bow tie. Peggy is sitting with a
	jacket on.

				ELIZABETH
		What's Peggy Sue going to do at
		your lodge meeting?

				BARNEY
		It's her 18th birthday, I want to
		show her off.

	Barney turns and winks at Peggy.

				PEGGY
		It was my idea, Grandma. I always
		wondered what went on at those
		lodge meetings.

				ELIZABETH
		He won't tell me, but I've got my
		suspicions. And I don't want any of
		that. Don't keep her out late.

				BARNEY
		Let's go.

				PEGGY
			(hugging Elizabeth)
		Good—bye, Grandma.

				ELIZABETH
		Have a good time.

	Barney and Peggy open the door and exit.

	EXT. FARMHOUSE DRIVEWAY

	Peggy and Barney approach the car.

				PEGGY
		What does Grandma think you do at
		your meetings?

				BARNEY
		Stag movies. Smokers.

	Peggy chuckles as they get into the car. The car proceeds
	along the driveway and turns onto the highway.

	INT. CAR — DRIVING

	Barney is at the wheel.

				BARNEY
		I may be an old fool, but I think
		we can help you.

				PEGGY
		I hope so. At least I got to see
		you and Grandma.
			(beat)
		Has it ever worked before?

				BARNEY
		The last one was six hundred years
		ago. It's about time for another
		one.

	INT. LODGE - NIGHT

	A one—story, pitch—roof building. The sign over the entrance
	reads.: THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN DAWN. Underneath the sign is
	a logo of a spreading sunrise. Peggy and Barney pull up to
	the front, exit the car and enter the building.

	INT. LODGE — ANTEROOM

	Thirty old men are congregating around the cloak room. Most
	are already dressed in long, purple robes with the sunrise
	logo over their hearts. They either wear or carry tri—corner
	hats. Peggy and Barney enter. Several men approach them.
	Peggy nervously clings to Barney' s arm.

				GEORGE
		Welcome, Peggy Sue. It's nice to
		have you with us.

				PEGGY
		Thank you.

				HENRY
		You know, you're a lucky girl. You
		could lay a bear trap in the aisle
		of the cathedral and never catch a
		better man than your grandfather.

				PEGGY
		Ah... thank you.

				BARNEY
		Let me take your jacket, Lilla.
		I've got, to get my robe.

	Peggy hands him her jacket as he heads over to the cloak,
	room.

				AL
		You know, this is very exciting for
		all of us.

				GEORGE
		We've been waiting a long time for
		someone like you.

	Barney rejoins them, wearing his hat and robe. The group
	begins to enter the main room.

				PEGGY
			(nervous)
		Do you have to wear that hat?

				BARNEY
		It wouldn't be a lodge without
		hats.

	Barney takes her hand and squeezes it. They walk slowly
	through the doorway.

				BARNEY
		Don't you worry. I'll be watching
		after you.

	INT. LODGE — MAIN ROOM

	A large meeting hall. The room is draped, and brightly lit
	with fluorescent lights. At one end sits a large, gold—
	painted wood throne. On either side are large candle holders,
	with lit candles. A small table serves as an altar in front
	of the platform. On a footstool is a potted plane with an
	artificial bird perched on its top. The throne and altar look
	like a set left over from a summer stock "Macbeth".

	Peggy and Barney enter. Several men lead Peggy away from
	Barney to the throne. One man places a go1den cape around her
	shoulders. They lead her up the platform to the throne.

				HENRY
		Hey, George. Get the lights.

	The LIGHTS are DIMMED. The room is lit by the candles.

	The men form a semi—circle around Peggy. Old men at the end
	of their lives, they are serious and passionate about the
	possibilities of life beyond this world. One by one, four men
	from either end of the line approach the altar with
	offerings: a cup of wine; an egg; a gold coin; and a rose.
	The men rejoin the line.

	LEO COOPER, a tall, white—haired man, takes two steps
	forward. The other men begin to sing a Gregorian chant.

				LEO
			(to Peggy)
		Are you ready, dear?

				PEGGY
		Yes, sir.

	Leo steps back, closes his eyes and spreads his arms.

				PEGGY
		Fasten your seat belts. Here we go.

				LEO
		Lord of the Universe, Vast and
		Mighty One. Ruler of Light, King
		of~ the sun. Creator of earth, air,
		fire and water.
			(kneeling down)
		We adore thee and invoke thee!
		Grant thine aid.
		Look with favor upon us as we
		witness the regeneration of man. We
		behold the innocent endeavors of
		single—minded men and women. For we
		are the company of unbodied souls
		and immortal angels. We ask thy
		intervention, that this girl may
		return to thee on the wings of your
		Love.

				PEGGY
			(sotto)
		This is never going to work.

	The old men form a circle in front of Peggy. They begin to
	circumambulate east to west, intoning together, their heads
	bowed. As Barney passes in front of Peggy, he winks at her.
	She smiles back.

				MEN
		Fount of life, Chariot of the
		Spirit, Womb of the Mother, reclaim
		thy child of light.

	We HEAR a clap of distant THUNDER. Peggy trembles. The
	artificial bird falls off the plant. Peggy is struck with
	amazement. She begins to glow, poised to take off. The men
	continue to chant while:

				LEO (O.S.)
		The name of your love is sacrifice.
		We offer up this girl, that her
		soul may find its home.

	Suddenly a door is opened, a gust of wind pours in and
	extinguishes the candles, plunging the hall into darkness.

				LEO (0.S.)
		Nothing to worry about. Somebody
		get the lights.

	The LIGHTS are TURNED ON. All the men look to the throne.

	Peggy is gone. They are speechless for a couple of beats.

				GEORGE
			(chipper)
		Well, the girl's gone. Let's play
		some poker.

	CLOSE ON BARNEY — He smiles, happy that she made it. George
	crosses to the wall, reaches behind the drapes and presses a
	button. The wall slides open to reveal a fully—equipped card
	room. The men shuffle in.

	EXT. BEHIND THE LODGE

	Charlie carries Peggy off towards his car, one hand covering
	her mouth. Peggy struggles. When they reach the car, he puts
	her down. She's still wrapped in her golden robe.

				PEGGY
		What the hell did you do that for?
		What are you doing here?

				CHARLIE
		I was trying to save you. They were
		going to vaporize you.

				PEGGY
		Don't be ridiculous! They're just a
		bunch of harmless old men. My
		grandfather was in there.

				CHARLIE
		You're going to listen to me.

	Charlie tries to Lead Peggy into the car.

				PEGGY
		I'm not getting in that blue
		monstrosity.

	Charlie pushes her inside, Peggy climbs back out. Charlie
	takes her hand and drags her up a hill behind the lodge hall.

				PEGGY
		Let me got! Where are you taking
		me?

				CHARLIE
		Right here. Now sit down.

	Charlie sits her down on the ground. She's impatient and
	hopping mad.

				CHARLIE
		Look. I wanna tell you. I forgive
		you for everything. I know what
		you've been going through. You're
		just scared. I was scared, too, but
		I'm not anymore.

				PEGGY
		How could you possibly know what
		I've been going through?

	Thunder and lightning. It starts to rain.

				CHARLIE
		Because I love you, damnit! I had a
		long talk with your father
		yesterday and we decided that the
		best thing for us to do is get
		married and settle down. Right
		away.

	Peggy jumps up, exploding to Charlie.

				PEGGY
		What do you mean you and my father
		decided? Who the hell are you to
		plan my life? Let's get married and
		live happily ever after. Bullshit.
		I got knocked up. I had to marry
		you. I never had a choice.

				CHARLIE
		What?

				PEGGY
		You betrayed me, Charlie. You were
		never there for me or the children.
		And now you come and tell me,
		"Peggy, you're scared." Of course
		I'm scared. If you knew what I knew
		you'd be scared shitless.

				CHARLIE
		You're crazy! You're really out of
		your mind!

				PEGGY
		I might be crazy, but I'm not crazy
		enough to marry you twice. There's
		a lot of things I can't change. I
		can't even think about them. I
		tried. But I couldn't even help
		Rosalie.
			(tears start)
		I don't want to be bitter. I'm a
		naturally optimistic person. But
		you took advantage of that.

	Charlie bends down to comfort her, in tears. He hugs Peggy
	and strokes her hair.

				CHARLIE
		Oh, Peggy. My poor Peggy. It's all
		my fault. I'm so sorry. I won't
		bother you anymore. I promise.
		Please stop crying. Please.

	Peggy starts to compose herself.

				PEGGY
		Will you take me back to my
		grandparents?

				CHARLIE
		Of course.

	Charlie helps her up. Be reaches into his pocket and takes
	out a small box, handing it to Peggy.

				CHARLIE
		It's almost your birthday. I wasn't
		sure when you were coming back, so
		I brought your present up here.

	With a slow, growing remembrance, Peggy opens the box. Inside
	is the gold locket Peggy was wearing at the reunion.

				PEGGY
			(anguished)
		Oh, Charlie.

				CHARLIE
		It opens, too. Look inside.

	Peggy opens the locket. She shivers with recognition.

	INSERT - LOCKET

	Two photos, one of Peggy, one of Charlie, as children.

				PEGGY
		Scott and Beth. Where did you get
		these?

				CHARM E
		Who's Scott and Beth? Your mother
		gave me our picture. That's you and
		me.

				PEGGY
		So are Scott and Beth.

	Peggy leans into Charlie, throwing her arms around him,
	holding on for dear life. She looks up at him, their
	foreheads touching.

				CHARLIE
			(tenderly)
		I love you.

				PEGGY
		I know.

	Charlie kisses her, passionately. The locket drops to the
	ground. HOLD on the locket, and...

					DISSOLVE:

	EXT. ON THE HILL - LATER

	Charlie and Peggy are lying on the ground, gazing up. A flash
	of lightning streaks across the sky.

				CHARLIE
		I think we should get out of here.
		It's going to rain.

				PEGGY
			(musing)
		Do you think anybody in the Fifties
		ever made love on a bed?

				CHARLIE
		What the hell is that?

	Flying high above them is an enormous, glowing, liquid neon
	kite. The center of the kite inscribed in lights, flashing
	like a marquee: HAPPY BIRTHDAY PEGGY SUE.

	The kite begins to descend towards them. Peggy jumps to her
	feet and races towards it. She grabs the tail and starts to
	sail away with the kite. Charlie chases after her.

				CHARLIE
		Peggy! Where're you going? Come
		back!

				PEGGY
		I've got to go now.

				CHARLIE
		But I love you. I'll love you
		forever.

				PEGGY
		I'll love you, too, Charlie. I'll
		love you for twenty years.

				CHARLIE
		Come back to me.

				PEGGY
		I'm trying.

	As Charlie watches helplessly, a huge bolt of lightning
	strikes his car. Peggy smiles. The men from the lodge run
	outside. They look up and above the blazing car and see Peggy
	floating away. Peggy sees her grandfather in the crowd and
	blows him a kiss. Charlie begins to run, following the kite
	cord to its source. He finds Richard, struggling to restrain
	the runaway kite.

				CHARLIE
		Richard, do something!

				RICHARD
		I can't! It's out of control!

	Suddenly the cord breaks. Peggy floats away.

				CHARLIE
		Peggy!

	Charlie, Richard and the old men behold Peggy, bobbing and
	dipping playfully in the sky. We begin to HEAR Charlie's
	VOICE singing "Peggy Sue" O.S. Peggy looks down with wonder
	at the earth, and then like a comet, soars into the
	blackness. In an instant she becomes a star.

	FINAL SCENE

					DISSOLVE/OPTICAL

	HOSPITAL ROOM - DAY

	Moving from two to C.U. Peggy, fragments of the reunion, the
	cake coming towards her, fragments of words in echo effect:
	'Your heart stopped for a while..." Father's voice:
	'You're a very lucky young lady...' Doctor: 'A (explain) of
	the head...' Mom's voice: 'But you're going to be all right
	now, the paramedics got there...' Mom, 'We were so
	worried..."

	Echoing of, until once voice is left. Charlie. Sitting
	opposite her bed, as he has been every minute of her illness.
	He looks wan and old, worried sick, but trying to sing 'Peggy
	Sue' for her.

				CHARLIE
		(singing softly).
		Peggy Sue, I love you, and I need
		you Peggy Sue...

				PEGGY
		Charlie? Was I dead?

				CHARLIE
		I thought you were...for a while.

				PEGGY
			(affectionately)
		You look awful, like you haven't
		slept in days. And so old.

				CHARLIE
		But happy. Very happy, Peggy Sue.

				PEGGY
		Charlie, I thought I knew
		everything about you.

				CHARLIE
		I wanted to apologize. I can't live
		without you.

				PEGGY
		What about Janet?

				CHARLIE
		That's over. I got tired of
		translating everything. She thought
		the Big Hopper was a hamburger.

	Charlie laughs uncomfortably and Peggy Sue looks around her
	hospital room.

				PEGGY
		Who are all the flowers from?

	Charlie pushes himself out of his chair and moves toward the
	dresser.

				CHARLIE
		Everyone.  Maddie and Arthur, Carol
		and Walter. Richard Norvick.  And
		here's a book, by that guy from
		high school, Michael Fitzsimmons. 
		He dedicated it to you.

	Charlie returns to Peggy's bedside and opens the front cover
	of the book.

	ANGLE ON BOOK: the front page bears the title "The Pilgrim
	Soul" and the dedication reads "to Peggy Sue and a Starry
	Night".

	Peggy smiles but shakes her head.

				PEGGY
		It couldn't be me.  I hardly knew
		him.

				CHARLIE
		I'll just set it right here.

	He places the book on her bedside table as he sits back down.

				PEGGY
		Charlie, I had a strange
		experience.  I went back to high
		school. And I spent a lot of time
		with you.  And you and Walter and
		Leon were singing "I Wonder Why".

				CHARLIE
		Oh, God, Dion.

				PEGGY
		You were terrific.  And I kept
		trying to push you away but you
		wouldn't give up.

				CHARLIE
		I'll never give up.

				PEGGY
		Then hold me.

	He holds her hand.

				CHARLIE
		I loved you since the day I met
		you, and I haven't stopped.

				PEGGY
		Don't try to charm me, Charlie
		Bodell.

				CHARLIE
		Listen, I don't expect all the
		troubles between us can just vanish
		away. But I would do what I can...

				PIGGY
		Charlie, please, I need some time.

				CHARLIE
		Well, I'll let you get some
		rest...so long.

	The VIEW PULLS BACK past the flowers. Charlie starts to exit.
	Checks himself in the mirror.

				PEGGY
		Charlie, I would like to invite you
		to dinner at home, on Sunday, with
		your kids. I will make a strudel.

	He hurries back to her, kisses her again.

	They hang on to each other as Beth enters the room.

					FADE OUT.
  
THE END
 
              



 PEGGY AND RICHARD SCENE
	To be inserted after Dolores/Peggy scene and to replace the
	goodbye to Richard scene.

	INT. SCHOOL LIBRARY - DAY

	Empty except for Richard who sits alone in a study warren,
	surrounded by books. Peggy approaches. Be puts down the book
	he's reading. He smiles.

				RICHARD
		You know, Peggy, there's so many
		things to look forward to in the
		future.

	Peggy leans over and kisses him, sadly, on the forehead.

				PEGGY
		I came to say goodbye.

				RICHARD
		Goodbye? Where're you going? What
		about our partnership? I'm making
		real progress with the microchip.

				PEGGY
		You were meant to  You're one of
		those fortunate people that good
		things happen to.

				RICHARD
		So are you. You've got a vision.

				PEGGY
			(manic)
		Vision? I'm a walking anachronism!
		I've upset my parents. I miss my
		kids. I could be trapped here
		forever! And poor Charlie...I got
		pregnant on my 18th birthday and we
		had to get married. Tomorrow's my
		birthday! I've got to get out of
		here now.

				RICHARD
		Did you break up with Charlie?

				PEGGY
		Yeah, yeah. I'm taking a big
		gamble. I've loved him for a long,
		long time.

				RICHARD
		Okay. Why don't we do something
		visionary. Change your destiny,
		Peggy Sue. Change your destiny and
		marry me.

				PEGGY
			(slamming down book)
		No! No! No! Peggy Sue got married!
		Case closed. I don't want to marry
		anybody. Goodbye Richard.

				RICHARD
		Wait! I'll go with you!

				PEGGY
		You can't. You're going to
		be Valedictorian.



Peggy Sue Got Married



Writers :   Jerry Leichtling  Arlene Sarner
Genres :   Comedy


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